Gilberte Martin

Gilberte Martin. Pianist, teacher, administrator, b Montreal 22 May 1910. She studied 1917-30 with Arthur Letondal (piano) and 1927-30 with Georges-Émile Tanguay (harmony). She won numerous prizes, grants, and diplomas, including the Prix d'Europe in 1930.

Martin, Gilberte

Gilberte Martin. Pianist, teacher, administrator, b Montreal 22 May 1910. She studied 1917-30 with Arthur Letondal (piano) and 1927-30 with Georges-Émile Tanguay (harmony). She won numerous prizes, grants, and diplomas, including the Prix d'Europe in 1930. At the École normale de Paris she studied piano with Mme Bascourret de Gueraldi and obtained a Prix de virtuosité. Alfred Cortot, Lazare Lévy, and Maurice Amour also were among her teachers. In 1932 she was the first Canadian woman admitted to the Paris Conservatory as a regular student; she also enrolled in Georges Caussade's fugue class. She gave numerous recitals before returning to Montreal in 1934. She was a soloist with the CSM in 1935 in Vincent d'Indy's Symphonie sur un chant montagnard français, in 1936 in Schumann's Introduction and Allegro appassionato, and in 1937 in Giovanni Sgambati's Concerto, and she gave public recitals and performed on radio. At the CMM, she taught piano, solfège, and harmony 1943-69 and was the staff representative to the administration 1969-71 and finally associate director 1972-3 and interim director in 1974. She also taught 1955-65 at the Institut Nazareth. Her numerous activities besides teaching have included examining and setting up study programs and examination criteria at the CMM and the AMQ and for festival competitions. Following one of her recitals in Paris, Le Monde musical described her as 'one of the best Canadian pianists' and continued, 'She combines great sensitivity with flawless sober playing.'

See also Alphonse Martin (her father) and Marcelle Martin, Magdeleine Martin, and Raymonde Martin (her sisters).

Writings

Doigtés pour les gammes en doubles-tierces et en doubles-sixtes et pour les arpèges de trois et quatre sons (Montreal 1943)