Kingston City Hall

Though the capital was moved in 1843, the building was completed the following year.

Kingston City Hall
Kingston City Hall represented a superb example of civic architecture in a neoclassical style (1843-44, George Browne architect) (photo by James H. Marsh).

Kingston City Hall

 Kingston City Hall and market was begun in 1842, a year after Kingston had been named capital of the Province of Canada. Designed by George BROWNE Sr, one of Canada's leading architects of the 19th century, it was an ambitious plan for the period. All civic offices - the town hall, municipal offices, post office, custom house, police station, market hall and mechanics' institute - were to be housed in one massive complex. Its heroic scale would have dwarfed all surrounding buildings and reflected the pride of the city fathers in the new status and future growth of their city.

Though the capital was moved in 1843, the building was completed the following year. The city hall and market was Browne's most important commission and the design, with its dome and monumental portico which dominated the main façade, represented a superb example of civic architecture in a neoclassical style.

See also , ARCHITECTURE, DEVELOPMENT OF.


Further Reading

  • M. Angus, The Old Stones of Kingston (1966).

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