Residential Tenancies Act (Reference)

The Supreme Court of Canada (1996) held constitutionally valid the legislative provisions of the Residential Tenancies Act of Nova Scotia which empowered the director of residential letting to act as a mediator in order to settle differences between landlords and tenants.

Residential Tenancies Act (Reference)

The Supreme Court of Canada (1996) held constitutionally valid the legislative provisions of the Residential Tenancies Act of Nova Scotia which empowered the director of residential letting to act as a mediator in order to settle differences between landlords and tenants. Judge McLachlin, who was supported by a majority of the Supreme Court of Canada, was of the opinion that since the function of resolving disputes in the matter of the rental of residential tenancies existed in 1867, and that it was then exercised by inferior tribunals, it was not in conflict with section 96 of the Constitution Act, 1867. Chief Justice Lamer arrived at the same conclusion for different reasons.