Tracy

In the late 19th century, increasing industrialization - including some shipbuilding - was accompanied by rapid population growth.
In the late 19th century, increasing industrialization - including some shipbuilding - was accompanied by rapid population growth.



Tracy

 Tracy, Qué, unincorporated place within the city of Sorel-Tracy, pop 34 194 (2001c), 36 021 A (1996c), area 58.07 km2. Tracy is located 75 km northeast of Montréal on the south shore of the ST LAWRENCE RIVER at the mouth of Rivière Richelieu. Formerly known as the municipal parish of Saint-Joseph-de-Sorel, the name Tracy was adopted in 1954 - when it was incorporated as a town - to honour Alexandre de Prouville, marquis de Tracy, the successful military governor of New France (1663-67), who built a fort near the present site. The Tracy region was part of a seigneury granted in 1672 to Pierre de Saurel, although some small-scale European settlement existed prior to this date. Following the American Revolution, some United Empire LOYALISTS settled here.

In the late 19th century, increasing industrialization - including some shipbuilding - was accompanied by rapid population growth. A brief but severe economic recession set in after WWII - for which Tracy's industries churned out large quantities of military material - but in the 1950s a construction boom and spreading urbanization swelled the population base. The iron and steel and titanium industries are the major forms of economic activity and the largest single employers in the city. Tracy's development is linked closely with the shipbuilding economy of nearby SOREL. In 2000, Tracy and Sorel merged to form the city of Sorel-Tracy.

A major archaeological discovery in 1961 produced fine examples of Iroquoian pottery, tools and weapons which pre-date European colonization.