Browse "Communities & Sociology"

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Charles Lalemant

Charles Lalemant, Jesuit missionary, first superior of the Jesuits at Québec (b at Paris, France 17 Nov 1587; d there 18 Nov 1674), brother of Jérôme Lalemant.

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Charles Norris Cochrane

Charles Norris Cochrane, historian, philosopher (b at Omenee, Ont 21 Aug 1889; d at Toronto 23 Nov 1945). He was educated at the University of Toronto (BA, 1911) and Corpus Christi College, Oxford, and was appointed to the Faculty of Ancient History at U of T in 1919.

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Charles Taylor

Charles Taylor, philosopher, political theorist (b at Montréal 5 Nov 1931). Charles Taylor was educated at McGill University, where he earned a BA in History. He then went as a Rhodes Scholar to Oxford, where he completed a BA, MA, and PhD in Philosophy.

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Charles Victor Roman

Dr. Charles Victor Roman, surgeon, professor, author, editor, philosopher, civil rights activist (born 4 July 1864 in Williamsport, Pennsylvania; died 25 August 1934 in Nashville, Tennessee). Charles Roman was raised in Dundas, ON, and was the first Black person to graduate from Hamilton Collegiate Institute in Hamilton, ON. After a tragic accident in his teenage years, he went on to establish himself as an internationally respected surgeon and educator.

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Charles de Koninck

Charles de Koninck, philosopher (b at Thourout, Belgium 29 July 1906; d at Rome, Italy 13 Feb 1965). A graduate of Louvain U, when he arrived at Québec's Université de Laval, Thomism was the established doctrine of philosophy in Québec.

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Charles Écuyer

Charles écuyer (or Ecuier). Priest, choirmaster, composer, baptized Montreal 20 Nov 1758, d Yamachiche, near Trois-Rivières, Lower Canada (Quebec), 29 May 1820. He was ordained in 1783.

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Charlie Panigoniak

Charlie Panigoniak. Singer, songwriter, guitarist, b Chesterfield Inlet, on Hudson Bay, District of Keewatin, NWT, 7 Mar 1946. By vocation he has been a carver and hunter, based first at Eskimo Point, NWT, and, after 1985, at nearby Rankin Inlet. As a boy he played a guitar made by his father.

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Charlie Watt

Charlie Watt, Inuk leader (born 29 June 1944 in Fort Chimo [now Kuujjuaq], Québec). Watt founded the Northern Québec Inuit Association in 1972 and was a negotiator for the James Bay Agreement, signed in 1975. He has served as a senator since 1984.

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Charlotte Whitton

After resigning from the Welfare Council in 1941, Whitton championed women's equality in politics and the workplace. However, her views on women, as on the WELFARE STATE, were contradictory. She opposed more liberal divorce laws and criticized married women who worked.

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Chester William New

Chester William New, university teacher, historian, biographer (b at Montréal 9 Oct 1882; d at Hamilton, Ont 31 Aug 1960). Raised and educated in Hamilton, New was a graduate of the University of Toronto and McMaster University.

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Chevalier Pierre Beaulé

Chevalier Pierre Beaulé, union leader/organizer, public servant (b at Québec City 31 Aug 1872; d there 8 Oct 1957). A shoemaker/machinist by trade, he was a member of the Shoemaker-Machinist Union at Québec and a participant in Cercles d'études ouvrier.

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Chiac

Chiac (also spelled chiak or chiaque) is a specific type of discursive switching between French and English among individuals who are highly bilingual and have Acadian French as their mother tongue but Canadian English as their first or second language.

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Chicho Valle

Chicho (Amador) Valle. Bandleader, singer, guitarist, b Cienfuegos, Cuba, 2 Jul 1922 or 1924, naturalized Canadian 1961, d Toronto 14 Oct 1984.

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Chief

Chief is a word used to denote status or leadership upon an individual in a group, clan or family. The origin of the word is European; colonists used it to refer to the leaders of Indigenous nations during the era of contact. While different Indigenous nations have their own terms for chief, the English version of the word is still used widely to describe leaders tasked with promoting cultural and political autonomy. The term is also used by institutions and organizations that are not exclusively Indigenous to refer to heads of staff (e.g., chief of police, commander-in-chief, chief executive officer). This article explores the historical and contemporary uses of the term in the Indigenous context.