Browse "Second World War"

Displaying 1-20 of 299 results
Article

Abe Jeffrey Levine (Primary Source)

"... once the screeching stopped, and that was agonizing, because you figured you’d be blowing up any, any second. And then blissful silence. That was that."

See below for Mr. Levine's entire testimony.


Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Article

Adriana Ouborg (Primary Source)

"The Dutch people in Arnhem helped the Allied forces, and helped to save as many of the Allied forces as possible."

See below for Ms. Ouborg's entire testimony.


Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Article

Albert “Bert” Hogg (Primary Source)

"I lifted him out of the stretcher and his back just literally fell out and he died right there in my arms. It’s in my mind all the time."

See below for Mr. Hogg's entire testimony.


Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Article

Albert Joseph Thomas (Primary Source)

"Gosh, I wonder if it could be possible? So I asked her a question and she says, yes. Well, I said, you’re looking at him. And she started crying. I’m pretty proud about what I did."

See below for Mr. Thomas' entire testimony.


Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Article

Alec MacInnis (Primary Source)

"A lot of children die in wars. We have to find a way to solve problems without killing on some battlefield, where the innocent become casualties."

See below for Mr. MacInnis' entire testimony.


Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Article

Alex Polowin (Primary Source)

Alex Polowin was a Lithuanian-Jewish Canadian who served in the Royal Canadian Navy on HMCS Huron, a Tribal class destroyer. Polowin escorted convoys to Murmasnk to supply the Soviets, hunted down the battleship Scharnhorst, and supported the amphibious invasion of Normandy in 1944. Listen to Polowin describe his motivations for enlisting in the Navy and the operations in which he took part.

Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Article

Alexander “Alex” van Bibber (Primary Source)

"It was all equal while we were in the army. The big mess up was on discharge."

See below for Mr. van Bibber's entire testimony.


Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Article

Alexander “Mack” Esdon (Primary Source)

"I was sent out to just check on lines. And this covering of artillery shells of all sizes going over, made for a very eerie and disquieting, but comforting, sound"

See below for Mr. Esdon's entire testimony.


Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Article

Allan “Al” Smith (Primary Source)

"So we got out of there and arrived at Stalag III. Now, that was a real Sunday school compared with Buchenwald."

See below for Mr. Smith's entire testimony.


Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Article

Andrew Mynarski, VC

The crew took off on its 13th sortie on 12 June 1944 to bomb a German supply line at Cambrai, France. Just after midnight, they were fired on by a German JU-88 fighter, sustaining heavy damage. The pilot ordered the crew to bail out.

Article

Anthony Russell (Primary Source)

"I went my own road, I didn’t follow the herd. And then I ran into the Americans. I stayed with the Americans to the end of the war."

See below for Mr. Russell's entire testimony.


Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Article

Archie MacNaughton

John Archibald (Archie) MacNaughton, soldier, farmer (born 7 October 1896 in Black River Bridge, NB; died 6 June 1944 in Normandy, France). Archie MacNaughton fought in both the First World War and Second World War. MacNaughton rose to the rank of major and was a well-respected officer with the North Shore New Brunswick Regiment. When he was 47 years old, MacNaughton led North Shore’s “A” Company into Normandy on D-Day. He was killed in action while pushing inland from Juno Beach.

Article

Arnold “Mac” McCourt (Primary Source)

"Now, we could have blasted the place off the map but Montgomery wanted the hand-to-hand fighting. He said the Canadians will handle it."

See below for Mr. McCourt's entire testimony.


Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Article

Arthur Philip Fraser (Primary Source)

"So we landed and when I jump off the boat and look around, and I saw so many dead soldiers or wounded, I was really surprised to see that."

See below for Mr. Fraser's entire testimony.


Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Article

Arthur Victor “Arty” Webster (Primary Source)

"That was a little over four-and-a-half weeks of fighting mostly by the infantry. Which was absolutely frightening."

See below for Mr. Webster's entire testimony.


Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.