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Article

Wilson-McAllister Guitar Duo

Wilson-McAllister Guitar Duo. Duo active 1977-89 and comprised of Donald (William) Wilson (b Elrose, Sask, 21 Feb 1952; B MUS Toronto 1975), and Peter McAllister (b Collingwood, Ont, 19 Aug 1954; B MUS Toronto 1977). Both were students of Eli Kassner.

Article

Winifred Bambrick

Winifred (Estella) Bambrick. Harpist, novelist, b Ottawa 21 Feb 1892, d Montreal 11 Apr 1969. She grew up in Ottawa and Chelsea, Que, and made her debut as a harpist at the Aeolian Hall, New York, 22 Oct 1913. The New York Times reviewer praised her 'decided virtuosity' and 'vigor of style'.

Article

Winifred Lugrin Fahey

Winifred Lugrin Fahey (b Lugrin, m Fahey). Soprano, teacher, composer, b Fredericton 22 Sep 1884, d Victoria, BC, 28 Oct 1966. Of United Empire Loyalist stock, she studied with R. Thomas Steele in Vancouver.

Article

Winnie Roach-Leuszler

Winnie Roach-Leuszler, swimmer (b at Port Credit, Ont 3 Feb. 1926; d at Surrey, BC 1 May 2004). Leuszler was the first Canadian to swim the English Channel. As a child she excelled in a wide range of sports both on land and in water but swimming soon emerged as her special talent.

Article

Winnifred Eaton (Onoto Watanna)

Winnifred Eaton Babcock Reeve (a.k.a. Onoto Watanna), author, screenwriter (born 21 August 1875 in Montreal, QC; died 8 April 1954 in Butte, Montana). Winnifred Eaton achieved literary fame under the pseudonym Onoto Watanna. She was the first person of Asian descent to publish a novel in the United States — Miss Numè of Japan (1899) — and to reach a mainstream audience. Her novel A Japanese Nightingale (1901) was adapted into a Broadway play and a motion picture. She also wrote screenplays for Hollywood and two novels, Cattle (1924) and His Royal Nibs (1925), about ranching life in Alberta.

Article

Winnifred Sim

(Margaret) Winnifred Sim, (b Johnston). Pianist, organist, teacher, b Winnipeg 28 Jun 1930; AMM piano 1949, AMM organ 1954, ARCCO 1965, ARCT 1966, FTCL 1973.

Article

Wintering Partner

A wintering partner (also "winterer") was an inland trader and shareholder, most notably in the North West Company. The wintering partner system evolved in New France, where fur merchants divided their profits with associates conducting the trade.

Article

Wishart Campbell

Wishart Campbell. Baritone, songwriter, pianist, b Oro Station, near Lake Simcoe, Ont, ca 1905, d Islay, The Hebrides, Scotland, 5 Nov 1983; ATCM voice 1927.

Article

Wolastoqiyik (Maliseet)

Wolastoqiyik (also Welastekwewiyik or Welustuk), meaning “people of the beautiful river” in their language, have long resided along the Saint John River in New Brunswick and Maine, and the St. Lawrence River in Quebec. Historically, the Europeans referred to the Wolastoqiyik by a Mi’kmaq word, Maliseet (or Malecite), roughly translating to English as “broken talkers.” The name indicates that, according to the Mi’kmaq, the Wolastoqiyik language is a “broken” version of their own. Today, there are six Wolastoqiyik Maritime communities in Canada and one in Maine. In the 2016 census, 7,635 people identified as having Wolastoqiyik ancestry.

Article

Wolf Koenig

Wolf Koenig, director, producer, cinematographer, editor, animator (born 17 October 1927 in Dresden, Germany; died 26 June 2014 in Toronto, ON).

Article

Wolfgang Bottenberg

Wolfgang (Heinz Otto) Bottenberg. Composer, teacher, b Frankfurt-am-Main 9 May 1930, naturalized Canadian 1964; B MUS (Alberta) 1961, M MUS (Cincinnati) 1962, DMA composition (Cincinnati) 1970. He trained as a carpenter before entering the Jesuit order in 1952.

Article

Wolfgang Kater

Wolfgang Kater. Instrument builder and designer; b Drangstedt, Germany, 5 Jun 1946; B MUS (McGill) 1972. He came to Canada in 1953 and lived in Toronto until 1959, when he moved to Montreal.

Article

Women and the Indian Act

The Indian Act has affected Indigenous cultures, systems of governance, societies and ways of life since its enactment in 1867. Gender discrimination in the Act further disadvantaged First Nations women, in particular. Until 1985, women with Indian status who married someone without status lost their status rights. Men, on the other hand, did not lose Indian status in the same way. Even after Bill C-31 reinstated the status rights of many women in 1985, the Act still discriminated against women by privileging male lines of descent. Amendments in 2011 and 2017 sought to fix these issues. In 2019, the federal government brought into force the remaining part of Bill S-3, which is meant to address lingering sex-based inequities in the Indian Act. (See also Indigenous Women’s Issues.)

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Women in STEM

This collection brings together the biographies of a number of remarkable women in the fields of science, technology, engineering and math.

Editorial

Women on Canadian Banknotes

Though Queen Elizabeth II has appeared on the $20 bill since she was eight years old, identifiable Canadian women have only appeared on a Canadian banknote once. In 2004, the statue of the Famous Five from Parliament Hill and Olympic Plaza in Calgary, and the medal for the Thérèse Casgrain Volunteer Award were featured on the back of the $50 note. They were the first Canadian women to appear on our currency. However, in 2011, they were replaced by an icebreaker named for a man (see Roald Amundsen). The new bill was part of a series of notes meant to highlight technical innovation and achievement, but the change sparked controversy. Other than the image of a nameless female scientist on the $100 note issued in 2011, and two female Canadian Forces officers and a young girl on the $10 bill issued in 2001, Canadian women were absent from Canadian bills.

On 8 March 2016, International Women’s Day, the Bank of Canada launched a public consultation to choose an iconic Canadian woman who would be featured on a banknote, released in the next series of bills in 2018. More than 26,000 submissions poured in. Of those, 461 names met the qualifying criteria, and the list was pared down to a long list of 12 and finally a short list of five. The final selection will be announced on 8 December 2016.

But how did we get here?

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