Browse "Buildings & Monuments"

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Earnscliffe

Earnscliffe, built in 1857 for Thomas MacKinnon, a successful businessman, was one of Ottawa's most impressive mansions of the mid-19th century.

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Eaton Centre

The Eaton Centre, Toronto (designed by the Zeidler Partnership and Bregman and Hamann, phase 1 opening in 1977, phase 2 in 1979) is the epitome of those vast multistorey interior "atrium" spaces for which Canadian architecture became known internationally in the 1970s. The centre comprises The T.

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Empress Hotel

The Empress Hotel is a luxury waterfront hotel and national historic site in Victoria, British Columbia. Designed primarily by architect Francis M. Rattenbury, it is noted for its picturesque Château-style design and decadent interiors. It opened in 1908 and was built by the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) as part of its network of hotels, which also includes the Banff Springs Hotel, Chateau Lake Louise and Le Château Frontenac. Now officially known as the Fairmont Empress, the hotel, along with its afternoon tea, is arguably Victoria’s most popular tourist attraction.

Macleans

Farewell to Montreal Forum

Yvon Lambert cherishes the memory of it still, the magic moment when he briefly wore the crown. Like so many Montreal fables, it is a story about hockey. And like most hockey stories in the city, it happened at the Forum, on a warm evening in May 17 years ago.

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Father Lacombe Chapel

Father Lacombe Chapel, located in St. Albert, is generally considered to be the oldest surviving building in Alberta. The chapel was built in 1861 by Father Albert Lacombe, an Oblate of Mary Immaculate missionary. In the early 1860s Father Lacombe became concerned with the future of the Métis.

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Fire on the Hill!

Members of the press gallery who took their time going down the winding staircase were quickly immersed in thick black smoke. Along the way they ran into the prime minister, Sir Robert Borden, and his secretary making their way to the exit almost on hands and knees.

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Fort Amherst

Fort Amherst, on the west shore of Charlottetown Harbour, PEI, was built in late 1758 by the British. The site had been known previously as Port La Joie, established in 1720 as the capital of the French colony of Île Saint-Jean.

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Fortification

Although the barrier posed by these walls was sometimes increased by setting a ditch below their outer faces, fortification did not progress beyond this rather simple conception until the 16th century.

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Forum

Forum. Montreal arena, home of the famous hockey team the Canadiens, and the site of many sporting, musical, and stage events. Situated at the corner of Atwater and Ste-Catherine streets, it is the property of the Canadian Arena Co.

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Frank Slide Interpretive Centre

The Frank Slide Interpretive Centre is located on the site of the FRANK SLIDE, in the municipality of CROWSNEST PASS, Alta. On 29 April 1903 part of Turtle Mountain broke away and slid through part of the mining community of Frank. There is still considerable controversy over the cause of the slide.

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Government Building

Government has always been the most important patron of ARCHITECTURE in Canada, and this role has increased rapidly over the past few decades. As its duties and responsibilities expand, so do its building needs. Today all levels of government contribute to all aspects of our built environment.

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Grand Theatre

Grand Theatre The original Grand Opera House opened amid a strong amateur and professional theatrical tradition on 8 Sept 1881 in the upper floors of the Masonic Temple at London, Ont. At its peak in the 1890s, the 2070-seat Grand was host to 100 companies and 300 performances annually.

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Green Thumb Theatre

Foon wrote Heracles, about Greek heroes; Raft Baby, a l9th-century tale from the BC interior; and The Windigo, from an Ojibwa myth. Shadowdance, written by Sheldon Rosen and directed by Yurek Bogajewicz, was an innovation in children's theatre and provided a frightening glimpse of a medieval world.

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Habitat 67

Habitat 67 is an experimental urban residential complex designed by Israeli-born architect Moshe Safdie and located in the Cité du Havre neighbourhood south of Montréal’s Old Port sector. Commissioned by the Canadian Corporation for Expo 67, the project derives its name from the theme of the fair, “Man and His World,” and became one of the major pavilions of the exhibition. It is the only remaining structure from Expo 67 to retain its original function. In 2015, the Guardian called Habitat “a functioning icon of 1960s utopianism, and one of that period’s most important buildings.”

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Hart House

Hart House's facilities include the Great Hall located in the East Wing which functions as an event venue, conference centre, and concert hall and houses a Steinway grand piano. The Music Room in the West Wing also boasts a grand piano, and is used for smaller concerts, lectures and events.