Browse "Cities & Populated Places"

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Saint-Lambert

Saint-Lambert, Qué, City, pop 21 599 (2006c), 21 051 (2001c), first incorporated in 1921 and reincorporated in 2006. Saint-Lambert was amalgamated into the city of Longueuil from 2002-2006 when it then regained municipal status. It is located along the South Shore of the St Lawrence River across from Montréal, and is connected to that city by the Victoria bridge (completed 1859).

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Saint-Luc

Saint-Luc was named by association with the neighbouring parishes of St-Martin and St-Marc. In 1963 it incorporated as the city of Saint-Luc with a population of 3218. Eel fishing was one of the mainstays of the economy. This industry remains part of present-day Saint-Luc.

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Saint-Nicolas

The old parish of Saint-Nicolas, settled in the last quarter of the 17th century and founded in 1694, takes its name from an old Normandy parish, Saint-Nicolas-de-la-Ferté. Saint-Nicolas, which had a population of 700 at the end of the 18th century, was set up as a parish municipality in 1855.

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Saint-Nicéphore

The municipality has its origins from 2 lumber communities which developed in the early 1800s, Wheatland and Watkins Mill. In 1873, Tourville Lumber Mills arrived in the area and began purchasing land for trees it shipped to its sawmill in Pierreville, downstream on the Rivère Saint-François.

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Saint-Pierre

In 1611, Samuel de CHAMPLAIN first made a reference to a small river that would later be named Rivière Saint-Pierre. A small community developed and this waterway made possible the construction of a large number of flour mills and sawmills.

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Saint-Quentin

Saint-Quentin, NB, incorporated as a town in 1992, population 2095 (2011c), 2250 (2006c). The Town of Saint-Quentin is located in northern New Brunswick in the Appalachian Highlands between the RESTIGOUCHE and MIRAMICHI rivers and tributaries of the SAINT JOHN RIVER.

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Saint-Raymond

Saint-Raymond's industrial activity has always been closely linked to the forest industry. Sawmilling, pulp and paper, wood products, house and cottage manufacturing as well as charcoal production, are still key economic activities.

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Saint-Romuald

Saint-Romuald was first settled in 1651 as a fishing establishment by a Québec merchant, Eustache Lambert. But it was agriculture which became the mainstay of economic life until the middle of the 19th century when Saint-Romuald became a sawmilling town.

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Sainte-Adèle

In the mid-1840s, as conditions worsened in the seigneuries, settlers came to the area called Les Cantons du nord, later, Les Pays-d'en-haut. The coming of the railway at the turn of the century assisted colonization and the establishment of the tourist industry in the area.

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Sainte-Agathe-des-Monts

In the 19th century, Sainte-Agathe had only a few sawmills, but the construction of the Montreal and Occidental Railway in 1892 (replaced by the CPR in 1900) encouraged tourism and the development of the hotels that have become the region's economic mainstay.

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Sainte-Anne-des-Monts

In 1863 the area became known as the Parish of Sainte-Anne-des-Monts. The first settlers named it in memory of their native parish of Sainte-Anne-de-la-Pocatière in France. In 1968, it became the city of Sainte-Anne-des-Monts.

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Sainte-Catherine

Sainte-Catherine was the original site of the Jesuit Iroquois mission founded in 1676 and later moved to Caughnawaga (now Kahnawake). The name Sainte-Catherine was quite probably chosen in honour of Kateri (Catherine) TEKAKWITHA. Her empty tomb is located across from the Roman Catholic church.

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Sainte-Thérèse

In 1714, Gaspard Piot de Langloiserie and his spouse, Marie-Thérèse du Gué, received the seigneury of Mille-Iles. In 1735 colonization occurred mainly through the efforts of the widow Marie-Thérèse du Gué and continued through her descendants.

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Salaberry-de-Valleyfield

Salaberry-de-Valleyfield draws its labour force from the local population and its history is marked by often violent labour disputes (see COMPANY TOWNS). Originally (1874) it was called Salaberry, in honour of Charles d'Irumberry de SALABERRY.

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Salmo

Salmo, BC, incorporated as a village in 1946, population 1139 (2011c), 1007 (2006c). The Village of Salmo is located in the Selkirk Mountains on the Salmo River at its junction with Erie Creek, 24 km north of the United States border.

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Salmon Arm

Salmon Arm, BC, incorporated as a city in 2005, population 17 464 (2011c), 16 012 (2006c). The City of Salmon Arm is located at the head of the southwestern arm of Shuswap Lake, also called Salmon Arm, 110 km east of KAMLOOPS.