Browse "Geographical features"

Displaying 301-320 of 450 results
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North Cape

North Cape, also called North Port, is the northern extremity of Prince Edward Island, dividing Northumberland Strait from the Gulf of St Lawrence proper.

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North Pole

The North Pole did not become a goal of ARCTIC EXPLORATION until fairly late; the few early expeditions that tried to reach it were looking for a polar route to the East rather than for the pole itself. W.E.

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North Saskatchewan River

​The North Saskatchewan River (1,287 km long, the first 48.5 km of which is designated as a Canadian Heritage River) is a major tributary to the Saskatchewan River, which ultimately flows into Hudson Bay. The mean annual flow is 241 m3/s; however, flow varies between the peak in July and minimum in February. It served as a major transportation route from the end of the last Ice Age through the mid-20th century.

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Northumberland Strait

A generally shallow depth causes strong tidal currents, water turbulence and a high concentration of suspended red silt and clay, which led early French colonists to name the strait "la mer rouge.

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Northwest Coast

 The Northwest Coast was the name given by 18th-century navigators and traders to the great arc of Pacific coast and offshore islands stretching from present-day northern California to an ill-defined point along the Alaska coast - at Prince William Sound or even Cook Inlet.

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Northwest Passage

The Northwest Passage is a sea corridor through Canada's Arctic archipelago and along the northern coast of North America. European explorers searched in vain for the passage for 300 years, intent on finding a commercially viable western sea route between Europe and Asia.

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Notre Dame Bay

Notre Dame Bay, 6000 km 2 , is a large inlet of the Atlantic Ocean on the northeast coast of Newfoundland. It contains many islands and its shores are indented by numerous coves and smaller embayments. One of Newfoundland's

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Nueltin Lake

Nueltin Lake, 2279 km2, elev 278 m, max length 144 km, is located on the border of Nunavut and northeastern Manitoba, about 660 km south of the Arctic Circle. An irregularly shaped lake, it has a heavily indented shoreline and contains numerous small islands.

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Nunatak

Nunatak (​Inuktitut, "lonely peak"), is a ​mountain rising above large ice sheets.

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Oak Island

In 1795, 16-year-old Daniel McGinnis discovered a depression in the ground near a huge oak tree and evidence that a block and tackle had been used there. McGinnis and 2 friends dug at the site, revealing a filled-in shaft with platforms of decayed oak logs at 3 m levels.

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Ocean

The interplay of these ocean waters with freshwater runoff from land creates the conditions that support large biological production on Canada's continental shelves and embayments (see COASTAL LANDFORM; DRAINAGE BASIN).

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Okanagan Lake

Okanagan Lake is located in the southern interior of British Columbia and is the largest lake in the Okanagan Valley.

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Old Crow Plain

The vegetation is of the tundra type, with outliers of the boreal spruce forest; willow thickets line the course of the Old Crow River.

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Oldman River

​The Oldman River is a heavily regulated river flowing through the arid, agricultural region of southwestern Alberta.

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Pacific Rim

The term Pacific Rim has been used to refer to all those countries with coastlines bordering the Pacific Ocean. However, in recent years the term has become synonymous with the Asia Pacific region which encompasses East and Southeast Asia, South Asia, Australia, New Zealand and North America.

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Parry Islands

The Parry Islands are a group of high arctic islands comprising Melville, Bathurst and Cornwallis islands, as well as a number of smaller ones. Melville is the largest of the 3 main islands and is also the highest, exceeding 1000 m in places.

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Partridge Island

Partridge Island is located in the Bay of Fundy, about 1 km from the shoreline and the city of Saint John, New Brunswick. The island was set aside as a quarantine station in 1785 and operated as such between 1830 and 1941. Many immigrants arriving to Canada by ship, including thousands of  Irish in 1847, were isolated on the island before being allowed to enter the country. This was done in an effort to prevent the spread of infectious diseases common on overcrowded vessels. In 1974, the Partridge Island quarantine station was designated a national historic site. Other important events are associated with the island, including the installation of the world’s first steam-operated fog alarm in 1859 (see also Robert Foulis).