Browse "Geographical features"

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Cape Blomidon

Cape Blomidon lies along the southeast shore of the Bay of Fundy at the mouth of Minas Basin, the site of some of the world's highest tides.

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Cape Kildare

Cape Kildare extends eastward into the Gulf of St Lawrence at the northern end of Prince Edward Island. Named by Samuel Holland in 1765 after James, 20th earl of Kildare, it is part of a series of capes in the area known as the Kildare Capes.

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Cape Race

Cape Race, elevation 30-40 m, is the southeastern extremity of Newfoundland's AVALON PENINSULA. Named for its flat-topped (Portuguese, raso) cliffs, it has a barren appearance that creates a stark impression for transatlantic

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Cape Sable

Cape Sable is the southernmost point of land on CAPE SABLE ISLAND, which lies off the southwestern tip of Nova Scotia. It is composed of shifting sand dunes (French, sable) up to 9 m high and is nearly joined to the island by a sandy beach transversed by Hawk Channel.

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Cape Sable Island

Cape Sable Island is a flat, wooded island off the southwestern tip of Nova Scotia. Connected to the mainland by a causeway on the north side, it shelters the waters of Barrington Bay to the east. The MIKMAQ hunted seals off Cape Sable Island.

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Cape Spear

Cape Spear, elev 75 m, most easterly point in N America (excluding Greenland), is located 6.7 km SE of the entrance to St John's harbour, Nfld. A rocky, windswept promontory of Precambrian formation, with a thin, sporadic cover

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Cape St Mary

Cape St Mary forms the southern boundary of St Mary's Bay in an area of Nova Scotia's northwestern coast known as the French Shore. Fishing is the principal activity in this region; the cape was once the site of the International Tuna Cup matches.

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Cape St Mary's

Cape St Mary's, elevation 105 m, on Newfoundland's AVALON PENINSULA, is the steep and spectacular terminus of the land separating ST MARY'S BAY and PLACENTIA BAY near rich fishing grounds. The site of a lighthouse since 1860, the

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Cascade Mountains

Cascade Mountains, BC, are the north end of largely volcanic mountain ranges extending to California, 180-260 km east of the Pacific Ocean. There are no active volcanoes in BC like the US Cascades' Mount St Helens and others.

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Cassiar District

The Cassiar District lies in British Columbia's northwest corner; it historically encompasses the Stikine and Dease River watersheds and that of the upper Taku, NASS and Kechika.

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Cassiar Mountains

The Cassiar Mountains extend from the Yukon Territory 440 km southeast to the confluence of the Finlay and Fox rivers in north-central BC. Cassiar is thought to derive from KASKA, the name of a native group whose traditional territory lies in the mountains.

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Cave

Origins Lava tube caves, an important minor class, are formed by channelled outflow of molten lava in congealing flows. Sea caves most commonly result from erosion by waves.

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Cedar Dunes Provincial Park

Tucked into the westernmost corner of Prince Edward Island, Cedar Dunes Provincial Park (established 1962, 37 ha) has been developed around an historic lighthouse. Known as West Point, the site is the result of centuries of accretion of sand from a north to south coastal current.

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Cedar Lake

Cedar Lake, 1353 km2, 62.5 km long, elev 253 m, is located in west-central Manitoba, north of Lake WINNIPEGOSIS. The lake draws most of its waters from the huge SASKATCHEWAN RIVER drainage basin. Construction of an earthfill dam and 25.6 km of dikes in 1961-64 caused lake levels to rise 3.

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Chaleur Bay

Chaleur Bay, which lies between the Gaspé Peninsula, Québec, and northern New Brunswick, is the largest bay in the Gulf of St Lawrence. At its entrance lies Miscou Island.

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Champlain Sea

The Champlain Sea is a body of saline to brackish water 55 000 km2 that occupied the depressed land of the ST LAWRENCE LOWLAND between Québec City and Brockville, Ont, and extended up the Ottawa River Valley during the late glacial period 12 000 to 10 000 years ago (seeGLACIATION).