Browse "Geographical features"

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Crown Point

Crown Point is a large peninsula strategically commanding the narrow passage of the southwestern portion of Lake CHAMPLAIN in upper New York State. It was initially the site of Fort Saint-Frédéric, built by the French in 1731 to defend French territory from English colonial invasion.

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Cumberland Sound

Cumberland Sound is a major inlet, 300 km long, with an average width of 65 km, in the east coast of BAFFIN ISLAND. Its steep sides rise over 2125 m to glacier-covered uplands.

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Cypress Hills

Ranching became important in the area after the Canadian Pacific Railway arrived at MAPLE CREEK in 1883. Beginning in 1906, part of the Cypress Hills was protected as a federal forest reserve. RESOURCE RIGHTS were transferred to the provinces in 1930.

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Dark Harbour

Dark Harbour, located on the west side of GRAND MANAN ISLAND, New Brunswick, is the only suitable haven for fishing craft along the island's western shore, which is dominated by high cliffs. It is relatively isolated from the communities on the more hospitable eastern side facing the Bay of Fundy.

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Dartmouth Lakes

The Dartmouth Lakes are 25 separate lakes located within the city of Dartmouth, NS, across the harbour from Halifax. Formed by Pleistocene glaciation about 15 000 years ago, they range in area from 1 to 140 ha.

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Davis Strait

Some of the greatest depths in the eastern Arctic are reached here (3660 m) in the southern end of the strait. The surface waters are strongly affected by counterclockwise-flowing currents.

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Dean River

Dean River, 241 km long, world-famous steelhead- and salmon-fishing stream, rises in the Fraser Plateau of west-central BC, flows northwest and west through the COAST MOUNTAINS and empties near the head of Dean Channel.

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Deer Island

Deer Island abuts the border with the US at the entrance to Passamaquoddy Bay on the south coast of New Brunswick. Long in dispute with the US, sovereignty over the island passed to NB in 1817. The name is probably descriptive. Fishing is the most important economic activity.

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Delta (Landform)

​A delta is a deposit of sediment at the mouth of a river that accumulates as the river flows into a standing body of water such as a lake or ocean. Because sediment tends to be rich in nutrients, deltas become fertile wetlands inhabited by diverse wildlife. Among the largest deltas in Canada are those of the Mackenzie and Saskatchewan rivers, as well as the Peace-Athabasca Delta (where the Peace, Athabasca and Birch rivers meet). Certain deltas offer advantageous access to natural resources and maritime transportation, but development projects are often controversial due to the ecological importance of these environments.

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Desert

The paucity of precipitation in deserts is due to one or a combination of causes.

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Detroit River

The Detroit River, 52 km long, flows south from Lake ST CLAIR to the west end of Lake ERIE, forming part of the boundary between Ontario and Michigan. Detroit, Michigan, and WINDSOR, Ontario, dominate its shores. Part of the ST LAWRENCE SEAWAY, it is heavily used by commercial traffic.

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Devon Island

The Truelove Lowland area of the island has diverse vegetation and wildlife, an abundance of soil water in the summer owing to blocked drainage, and greater precipitation and higher summer temperatures (4° to 8°C), with more clear days than other parts of the island.

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Dixon Entrance

Dixon Entrance is a strait between Haida Gwaii on the north coast of British Columbia and Prince of Wales and Dall islands in Alaska.

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Drainage Basin

A drainage basin is an area of land that contributes the water it receives as precipitation to a river or network of rivers.

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Dubawnt Lake

Dubawnt Lake, 3833 km2, elevation 236 m, is situated in the southern part of mainland Nunavut, 350 km south of the Arctic Circle. Within the Precambrian SHIELD, the lake has irregular shorelines and numerous islands.

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Dubawnt River

Dubawnt River, 842 km long, rises from a web of lakes in the Northwest Territories, 120 km northeast of Lake Athabasca