Browse "Geographical features"

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French River

The French River, 290 km long (to head of Sturgeon River), rises from Lake Nipissing in northeastern Ontario and flows 110 km west towards Georgian Bay.

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French Shore

The French Shore was an area of coastal Newfoundland where French fishermen enjoyed treaty rights granted by the British from 1713 to 1904.

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Funk Island

Funk Island, 25 ha, is a flat, 15 m high, wedge-shaped granite island 800 m by 400 m lying 60 km off Newfoundland's northeast coast, east of FOGO ISLAND. The origin of the name is unknown, though it may have been inspired by the smell of the guano that covers much of the island.

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Fury and Hecla Strait

Fury and Hecla Strait is located at the northern end of Foxe Basin, connecting the basin with the Gulf of Boothia, and separating Melville Peninsula on the mainland and Baffin Island to the north.

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Galiano Island

Galiano Island, 5787 ha, is one of BC's GULF ISLANDS, named for Spanish navy commander Dionisio Alcalá-Galiano, who explored the area in 1792. It has the driest climate of the islands.

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Gander River

Gander River, 175 km long, drainage basin 6400 km2, is the principal river of northeast Newfoundland, emptying into Gander Bay. Named for its abundant geese, it rises in the central plateau and eventually falls 427 m to the Atlantic.

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George River

George River, 560 km long, in northern Québec, drains N into the E side of Ungava Bay. Its southern and eastern divides, along with those of tributary rivers Ford and De Pas, extend along much of the Québec-Newfoundland and Labrador border.

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Georges Bank

Georges Bank is a large submarine bank (250 km by 150 km) at the edge of the Atlantic continental shelf between Cape Cod and Nova Scotia. Typical water depths are 50-80 m, but in some areas the water shoals to 10 m and less.

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Georgian Bay

In contrast to the soft, white limestone cliffs of the west shore, the east shore is cut into the hard edge of the Canadian Shield, fractured into myriad bays, inlets and sounds, with thousands of islands strewn along the coasts.

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Gold River

Gold River, BC, incorporated as a village in 1972, population 1267 (2011c), 1362 (2006c). The Village of Gold River is located approximately midpoint on the west coast of VANCOUVER ISLAND at the head of Muchalat Inlet in NOOTKA SOUND.

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Grand Banks

The water over the banks is mainly supplied by the southward-flowing cold LABRADOR CURRENT. This current splits as it approaches the Grand Banks, with one branch moving south along the coast of Newfoundland through Avalon Channel to St Pierre Bank.

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Grand Lake

Grand Lake, 534 km2, elevation 85 m, max length 100 km, up to 300 m deep, largest lake on the Island of Newfoundland, is located on the west side of the Island, 24 km southeast of CORNER BROOK.

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Grand Manan Island

With a population of about 2500 - chiefly in the villages of North Head, Grand Harbour and Seal Cove - its chief industries are scallops, herring, lobster and salmon aquaculture, dulse (seaweed) gathering and tourism.

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Grand River

From its source just south of Georgian Bay, the Grand River winds 266 km to Lake Erie, dropping 352 m along the way. Together with its major tributaries, the Speed, Nith, Conestogo and Eramosa rivers, it drains 6200 km2, the largest watershed in southern Ontario.

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Great Lakes

The Great Lks occupy bedrock depressions that have been differentially eroded by glacial ice, and their form and location are largely controlled by structural geology.

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Great Slave Lake

Great Slave Lake is located in the Northwest Territories. It is the second largest lake entirely within Canadian borders, the fifth largest in North America, and the tenth largest in the world.

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Grosse Île and the Irish Memorial National Historic Site

Grosse Île is an island in the St. Lawrence Estuary, 46 km downstream from Quebec City. It is 2.9 km long and 1 km wide and consists of a wooded Appalachian ridge surrounded by a coastline of coves and capes. It is one of the 21 islands composing the Isle-aux-Grues archipelago. It has also been known as Île de Grâce and Quarantine Island. From 1832 to 1937, it was used as a quarantine station for the port of Quebec City. Over this century of activity, more than 4 million immigrants passed through this station, including nearly 90,000 during the “black year” of 1847. Closely tied to memories of Irish immigration to Canada, Grosse Île is a Canadian national historic site, administered by Parks Canada and open to the public.