Browse "Arts & Culture"

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La vraie nature de Bernadette

At a time when the once all-powerful Catholic Church had lost its grip on Québécois, director Gilles Carle made this sardonic fable about a woman’s quest to find spiritual harmony on her own terms. It won five Canadian Film Awards — including best director, screenplay, lead actress and supporting actor — and was also very popular in France, where it screened in competition at the Cannes Film Festival. Considered one of the best Canadian films ever made, it was named one of the Top 10 Canadian films of all time in a poll conducted by the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) in 1984, and one of 150 essential works in Canadian cinema history in a similar poll in 2016.

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Language

Before it can become a form of communication, a language must have become a system of representation. This is necessary if the meanings of its words and sentences are to be understood by people communicating in the same language, that is, by using the same code.

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Le Devoir

 Le Devoir is a Montréal NEWSPAPER started by Henri BOURASSA in 1910 as a pan-Canadian-nationalist, pro-French-Canadian, pro-Catholic, anti-British but independent newspaper.

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Le déclin de l'empire américain (The Decline of the American Empire)

A comedy of manners that functions as a sharp socio-political satire, Denys Arcand’s Le déclin de l'empire américain (1986) is widely considered one of the best Canadian films ever made. It won eight Genie Awards — including best picture, director and screenplay — and several international honours, including an Academy Award nomination for Best Foreign Language Film. It was named one of the Top 10 Canadian films of all time in two polls conducted by the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF), and the 10th-best Canadian film of all time in a 2002 Playback readers’ poll. It was followed by a sequel, the Academy Award-winning Les Invasions barbares, in 2003. In 2016, it was named one of 150 essential works in Canadian cinema history in a poll conducted by TIFF.

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Les Grands Ballets Canadiens de Montréal

Founded in 1958 by Ludmilla Chiriaeff, Les Grands Ballets Canadiens de Montréal is the most progressive and experimental of Canada’s three big ballet troupes (the National Ballet of Canada and the Royal Winnipeg Ballet being the other two). It is noted for a diverse repertoire that has emphasized new works as well as traditional 19th-century story-ballets and 20th-century classics. The company has also had a strong record of commissioning original works that are often choreographed, composed and designed by Canadians (see also Dance in Canada).

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Les Petits chanteurs de Granby

Les Petits chanteurs de Granby. Choir school of about 100 children's and men's voices. It was founded in 1931 in Granby (60 km east of Montreal) by Brother Julien Hamelin of the Frères du Sacré-Coeur. The ensemble enjoyed the official patronage of the city.

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Les Plouffe

Les Plouffe (1948), a novel by Roger Lemelin in which the author's expansive comic gift offers an insider's view of Québec's working-class Lower Town district.

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Les Plouffe

Roger LEMELIN's famous novel, LES PLOUFFE, had already been serialized for radio in 1952 before being made into the first, and hugely successful, téléroman (1953-59) for Québec television. The story of the Plouffe family became deeply woven into the fabric of Québec popular culture.

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Longhouse

A longhouse was the basic house type of pre-contact northern Iroquoian-speaking peoples, such as the Huron-Wendat, Haudenosaunee, Petun and Neutral. The longhouse sheltered a number of families related through the female line. In the 1700s, European-style single-family houses gradually replaced longhouses as primary residences. However, longhouses still function as important facilities in which some Indigenous peoples conduct ceremonies, political meetings and various community gatherings.

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Nobel Prizes and Canada

The Nobel Prizes are awarded annually for achievements that have significantly benefitted humankind. The prizes are among the highest international honours and are awarded in six categories: physics, chemistry, physiology or medicine, literature, peace, and economics. They are administered by the Nobel Foundation and awarded by institutions in Sweden and Norway. Seventeen Canadians have won Nobel Prizes, excluding Canadian-born individuals who gave up their citizenship and members of organizations that have won the peace prize.

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Pouding Chômeur

​The Québécois dessert called pouding chômeur — poor man’s pudding, or more literally, pudding of the unemployed — is delectably rich and incredibly simple.