Browse "Health & Medicine"

Macleans

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

Ashley Roll's mother is reluctant to have her come to the phone. She's worried that answering questions will take too much out of the 19-year-old, but Ashley says she's feeling up to it. Because of chronic fatigue syndrome, Roll is almost a prisoner of her home in Burnaby, B.C.

Article

Cod Liver Oil

Cod Liver Oil was in the past a primary source of vitamin A, essential for bone growth, health of skin and mucous membranes, and night vision. Today, many other preparations containing vitamin A are available. Before the 1920s, most cod liver oil came from Norwegian COD.

Article

Cold-Weather Injuries

Hypothermia may be defined as a "lower than normal" body temperature. Normal body core temperature is 37.5°C. Mild hypothermia and shivering may occur at body temperatures as high as 36°C. Lower body temperatures are considered as moderate to severe hypothermia.

Macleans

Colon Cancer in Decline

In July, 1994, Cindy Stewart was playing first base in a Vancouver softball game when she stretched to catch a ball - and felt a sharp pain in her lower abdomen. When the pain persisted, Stewart checked into hospital and, after testing, was diagnosed with colon cancer.

Article

Criminology

Most of the criminological research in Canada has been done at those universities where centres focusing on research have evolved. The Université de Montréal established Canada's first School of Criminology with Denis Szabo in 1960.

Article

Cystic Fibrosis Canada

Cystic Fibrosis Canada is a national, nonprofit, voluntary health agency established 15 July 1960. Cystic fibrosis is a disorder that occurs when a child inherits 2 genes for the condition, one from each parent.

Article

Death

For centuries the law has accepted the cessation of heartbeat and respiration as the determination of death, but now the heart can be removed, the breathing stopped and blood pumped by machines without preventing the individual's resumption of lucid consciousness.

Article

Death and Dying

Death, the irreversible cessation of life, has always intrigued and frightened mankind. Every known culture has attempted to provide an explanation of its meaning; like birth or marriage it is universally considered an event of social significance, amplified by ritual and supported by institutions.

Article

Dentistry

Dentistry is the art of the treatment of teeth and their supporting tissues. The Egyptians, in their papyri dating back to 3500 BC, described dental and gingival ("of the gums") maladies and their management, and evidence of teeth restoration has been found in Egyptian mummies.

Macleans

Depression

The first serious bout was back in 1963, when he was attending Queen's University and, just before final exams, locked himself in his dorm room for two weeks.

Article

Diabetes

Diabetes mellitus, commonly referred to as diabetes, is a disease in which the body either produces insufficient amounts of insulin or cannot use insulin properly.

Article

Dietetics

Dietetics (from the Greek diaita, meaning "mode of life") has been implicated in the cause, cure and prevention of disease from earliest recorded history.

Article

Disability

Disability is defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as the temporary, prolonged or permanent reduction or absence of the ability to perform certain commonplace activities or roles, sometimes referred to as activities of daily living.

Article

Disease

In recent years genetic diseases have become better understood since they are dependent on a fault in the normal gene sequence that controls body activities.