Browse "Sports"

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Hockey Canada

Hockey Canada is the official governing body of hockey in Canada, representing the country as a member of the International Ice Hockey Federation.

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Hockey Hall of Fame

   The Hockey Hall of Fame, founded on 10 September 1943, was the result of meetings of the NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE and the Canadian Amateur Hockey Association. Kingston's mayor, Stuart Crawford, was elected its president.

Editorial

Hockey: Canada's Game

That hockey is “our game” is incontestable. We invented it. We dominated it for so long and to such a degree that we could cobble together teams of amateurs, servicemen and semi-pros and beat the best the rest of the world had to offer.

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Hunting

In Canada, hunting at will for food is possible for Indigenous peoples belonging to groups that obtained that right when they ceded lands under treaty, and for Indigenous peoples belonging to other groups by virtue of acknowledged aboriginal title.

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Ice Hockey in Canada

Hockey is Canada's official national winter sport and perhaps its greatest contribution to world sport. Canada is considered the birthplace of ice hockey, and Canadians generally regard the sport as their own.

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Ice Skating

Ice skating probably originated in Scandinavia over 2000 years ago as a means of transportation.

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In-line Skating

In-line skating is a recent recreational sport. During the 1990s it experienced an incredible boom that relegated traditional roller skating to the museum.

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Indoor Bowling

Bowling, indoor, game in which a player attempts to knock down pins by propelling a ball down a wooden lane. Similar games were played as early as 5000 BC in Egypt. The 10-pin version was developed in the US in the 19th century, and 5-pin bowling was invented in Canada in 1908 or 1909 by Thomas F.

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Jackie Robinson and the Montreal Royals (1946)

On 15 April 1947, Jackie Robinson played in his debut game with the Brooklyn Dodgers, becoming the first African American to play in the major leagues in the modern era. Prior to that point, professional baseball in the United States was segregated, with African Americans playing in the Negro leagues. When Robinson broke Major League Baseball’s colour barrier in 1947, he entered American history books. What many baseball fans may not realize, however, is that Robinson was embraced by Canadian fans one year earlier as a member of the Montreal Royals, a farm team for the Brooklyn Dodgers.

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Judo

Judo literally means "the gentle way." It is a sport developed from JIU-JITSU, a group of self-defence methods, but with certain harmful techniques eliminated or modified for safety's sake. Judo incorporates ethics, art and science into a sport that uses the opponents' strength against themselves.

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Karate

Karate, which translates as "empty hands," is a form of unarmed combat employing a variety of punches, open-hand strikes, kicks and blocks.

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Kayak

For over 2,000 years, the Inuit have used kayaks for traveling and hunting expeditions, except for the most northerly polar Inuit.

Editorial

Klondikers Challenge for the Stanley Cup

​With our national game now a multi-billion-dollar professional sport, it is perhaps comforting to look back to simpler times when hockey was closer to community, and was played for love and glory by amateurs. In the early days of Stanley Cup competition, any Canadian team with some success at the senior level could challenge the current champs. In 1905 one of the strangest challenges came from Dawson City, Yukon.

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Lacrosse

Lacrosse is one of the oldest organized sports in North America. While at one point it was a field game or ritual played by First Nations, it became popular among non-Indigenous peoples in the mid-1800s. When the National Lacrosse Association of Canada was formed in 1867, it was the Dominion of Canada’s first governing body of sport. Lacrosse was confirmed as Canada’s official summer sport in 1994. The Canadian national lacrosse teams (men and women) rank highly in the world standings, both in field and box lacrosse.

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Lacrosse Stick

Traditional lacrosse sticks are made of a single piece of wood, bent to form the head of the stick (the part used for catching, carrying, and throwing the ball). Traditionally, Indigenous stick makers wrapped pliable steamed hickory around a tree in order to bend it.