Browse "Things"

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Virus

Virus, the smallest form of life (20-300 nanometres), is structurally and functionally unique. Their size is such that they do not contain enough genetic material to code for the proteins they require for reproduction, nor do they have ribosomes needed to synthesize these proteins.

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Volcano

 A volcano is an opening in the crust of a planetary body through which liquid, gaseous or solid material is expelled; also the structure formed by eruption of this material.

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Vole

Vole, common name for several rodents of family Muridae, found only in the northern hemisphere.

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Volleyball

The playing court, 18 m x 9 m, is divided by a centreline. Above the centreline is an extended net, placed 2.43 m high for men and 2.24 m high for women. The goal of the game is to send the ball, according to the regulations, over the net to the floor on the opposite court.

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Voyageur

A worker, minor partner in a company or independent contractor involved in the fur trade. Today, the word voyageur, like the term coureur des bois, evokes the romantic image of men canoeing across the continent in search of furs and living a life full of perilous adventure, gruelling work and cheerful camaraderie.

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Vulture

The vulture is a large, long-winged, bald-headed bird of prey, normally abundant in warmer latitudes.

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Waffle

Waffle, a group established in 1969 as a caucus within the NEW DEMOCRATIC PARTY. Its members' choice of name was self-consciously ironic.

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Walleye

Walleye (Stizostedion vitreum vitreum), moderately large, predatory freshwater fish of the family Percidae (order Perciformes).

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Walnut

Walnut (Juglans), genus of trees of the walnut family (Juglandaceae). The roughly 15 known species are widely dispersed through temperate and tropical regions.

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Walrus

The walrus is a tusked, fin-footed mammal. In Canada, the Atlantic walrus is found primarily along the northern coasts of Hudson Bay, Davis Strait, Foxe Basin and Baffin Bay.

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Wampum

Wampum are tubular purple and white beads made from shells. Wampum are used primarily by Aboriginal peoples of the Eastern Woodlands for ornamental, ceremonial, diplomatic and commercial purposes.

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Wapiti

The Wapiti (Cervus canadensis) is the second largest (after the moose), most highly evolved Old World deer. It is also known as the American elk.

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Warbler

Warbler is a name applied to several groups of birds, primarily the New World wood warblers, and Old World warblers of which only 3 species commonly breed in Canada.

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Warrendale

The DOCUMENTARY FILMWarrendale (1967) covers seven weeks in a Toronto-area treatment centre occupied by twelve emotionally disturbed children, most of them abandoned by their parents.

Macleans

Water Wars

They are an unlikely class of political provocateurs: the water entrepreneurs. In Vancouver, fast-talkers with dreams of getting in on the ground floor of a 21st-century boom once touted their plans for taking pure British Columbia mountain water in tankers to California. Shut down by a B.C.

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Wasp

Wasp is a term applied to stinging insects in the division Aculeata of the order Hymenoptera, which also includes ants and bees.

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Water

Worldwide, over two-thirds of precipitation falling on land surfaces is evaporated and transpired back into the atmosphere. In Canada less than 40% is evaporated and transpired; the remainder, called the water yield, enters into streamflow.

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Waterfall

A waterfall is a phenomenon which occurs when water flowing in a river channel encounters a vertical or near-vertical drop in the channel bed.

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Waterfowl

Waterfowl is a general term used for members of the family Anatidae, composed of closely allied species commonly known as ducks, geese and swans.

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Wavelength

Michael SNOW's Wavelength (1967), Canada's most famous and widely seen EXPERIMENTAL FILM, is a minimalist masterpiece and an important, influential work in the history of cinema.