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Article

Clair Oreal Hawn (Primary Source)

"And there was a sign, if you went over there to deliver messages, there was a sign that [said] “No speed limit -rush like hell”."

See below for Mr. Hawn's entire testimony.


Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Article

Cliff Henry Lloyd (Primary Source)

"You know what they had for dinner? Fried apples because they were short of food there. I said to the guy that was looking after the rations, I told him . He said, well, take your ration up and give it to them"

See below for Mr. Lloyd's entire testimony.


Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Article

Bob Ross (Primary Source)

"Then I looked down, my leg was off. Holy mackerel. Shrapnel must have hit my leg. I says, “God, my leg is gone.”"

See below for Mr. Ross's entire testimony.


Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Article

Michael Kucher (Primary Source)

"If you were there and you saw all those ships! It was unbelievable! Everything that you can think of. Aircraft carriers. Destroyers. Everything."

See below for Mr. Kucher's entire testimony.


Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Article

Keith Flanigan (Primary Source)

"I was the first out and my job was to open the escape hatch and then lead the way out. So I was the first out after the hatch was released and I landed somewhere between the two front lines, which was the River Maas."

See below for Mr. Flanigan's entire testimony.


Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Article

Leonard Roy “Len” Link (Primary Source)

"When you join up, you join up to fight, you don’t up to be guinea pigs. But I have no bitter thoughts about that and if it had to be again, I’d do it for my country."

See below for Mr. Link's entire testimony.


Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Article

Gordon Andry (Primary Source)

"It was no picnic, I’ll tell you. Anyone that says they weren’t afraid is a liar or he wasn’t there."

See below for Mr. Andry's entire testimony.


Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Article

Edmond Arsenault (Primary Source)

"There was a shell coming and I knew by the sound it was close. So I look at the hole and I look at the barn and I figure, I’ll make the barn first."

See below for Mr. Arsenault's entire testimony.


Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Article

George Henry Dancer (Primary Source)

"So that meant there was eight of us and this was a three man dinghy. So we all got out there on the wing with the good float on it, to keep that other wing from getting down in the water."

See below for Mr. Dancer's entire testimony.


Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Article

Sidney Albert Appleyard (Primary Source)

"Some of us in headquarters went into and checked the weights of these German soldiers when they were captured. There was none that lost any weight."

See below for Mr. Appleyard's entire testimony.


Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Article

Jim Guy (Primary Source)

"Their tents had to be all [up] and they threw down their own tents. An officer or a man didn’t make any difference there. If help was required, you gave it."

See below for Mr. Guy's entire testimony.


Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Article

Indigenous Peoples and the Second World War

In 1939, Canada found itself at war for the second time in a generation. As in the First World War (1914-18), thousands of Indigenous soldiers and nurses volunteered for the war effort at home and abroad, serving with distinction in the Canadian army, navy, and air force. At least 4,250 First Nations soldiers enlisted in the Canadian military in the Second World War, with thousands more Métis, Inuit, and non-Status Indian soldiers serving without official recognition of their Indigenous identity.

Article

Ely Edmond Boeykens (Primary Source)

"The first thing we do most of the time is , “See that steeple on the church? Shoot it down.” Catholic church steeple, had to shoot the steeples down, because the Germans used to stand up there to look at you."

See below for Mr. Boeykens' entire testimony.


Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Article

James Duncan “Jim” Ritchie (Primary Source)

"We never had any problem with them. We’d go to their barber shops and get our hair cut. We were invited to their homes for meals."

See below for Mr. Ritchie's entire testimony.


Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Article

Fred William Cash (Primary Source)

"So we couldn’t do anything about it other than watch them go into the sea. And that was a horrible, horrible, horrible experience for all of us."

See below for Mr. Cash's entire testimony.


Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Article

Jack Western (Primary Source)

"The plane itself went down in what we call a flat corkscrew. Circling round and round and round and round and round...from about 12,000 feet"

See below for Mr. Western's entire testimony.


Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Article

Ian Syme (Primary Source)

"People, unless they're very stupid or very unintelligent, do feel fear. You live with fear."

See below for Mr. Syme's entire testimony.


Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Article

David Abells (Primary Source)

"When I think of my grandchildren at 18 years old, I would, heck, definitely not like to think that they would have to see this type of thing."

See below for Mr. Abells' entire testimony.


Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Article

Verna Ritchie (Primary Source)

"Early '44, the call came for three Red Cross girls to go to St. Dunstan's, which was the rehabilitation centre for war blind in England, and I was one of the three."

See below for Ms. Ritchie's entire testimony.


Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.

Article

Malcolm MacConnell (Primary Source)

"I thought we were really done for but I was able to get back up into the clouds and I abandoned my attack. But that was a very very close one."

See below for Mr. MacConnell's entire testimony.


Please be advised that Memory Project primary sources may deal with personal testimony that reflect the speaker’s recollections and interpretations of events. Individual testimony does not necessarily reflect the views of the Memory Project and Historica Canada.