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Article

Sagebrush

The greatest variety of native sagebrushes occurs in the western mountains, where species that range from Alaska to California and Colorado are found. Several species range across the prairies and 2 species are transcontinental in Canada. Sagebrushes grow on dry plains, hills and rocky slopes.

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Spiraea

Spiraea is a genus of small shrubs of the family Rosaceae (rose). The genus consists of some 70-80 species, as well as many horticultural varieties of garden origin that have resulted from hybridization. Probably the most noteworthy of these hybrids is S.

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Silviculture

Silviculture is the branch of FORESTRY that deals with establishing, caring for and reproducing stands of trees for a variety of forest uses including wildlife habitat, timber production and outdoor recreation.

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Tobacco

Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) is an annual (potentially perennial) herbaceous plant of the nightshade family.

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Tobacco-Products Industry

Although Canada's tobacco industry has developed largely during this century, tobacco growing goes back to early colonial days, when settlers around the St Lawrence River adopted the smoking customs of aboriginal peoples. French settlers began by copying the agricultural model set by the Indians.

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Sumac

Sumac is a shrub of the genus Rhus of the family Anacardiaceae.

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Thistle

The thistle (Carduaceae tribe, family Compositae or Asteraceae) is a spiny herbaceous plant with white or purple flowers. There are 800 species worldwide, 46 in Canada (15 native). Native species (none serious WEEDS) are mainly "true" or "plumed" thistles of genus Cirsium.

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Vegetable

A vegetable is a herbaceous plant of which all or a part is eaten, raw or cooked. Vegetables are a valuable source of protein, vitamins, minerals, trace elements and fibre. All vegetables are high in carbohydrates, which contribute to their unique taste.

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Forestry Education

Throughout the late 1980s and the 1990s, there was a tremendous evolution of FORESTRY in Canada and around the world. Forestry became increasingly important for both the ECONOMY and the ENVIRONMENT, and the practice of forestry became more complex.

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Pea

Some pea cultivars are grown in gardens for their tender green pods as VEGETABLES, which are harvested at their early stage of development, and eaten raw or cooked. They are known as snowpeas, sugar peas or snap peas. In parts of Asia and Africa, tender pea foliage is harvested as vegetable.

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Witch Hazel

Witch Hazel is the common name for a family (Hamamelidaceae) of trees or shrubs and refers especially to members of the genus Hamamelis.

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Violet

The Violet is a family (Violaceae) of annual or perennial herbaceous plants widely distributed throughout temperate and tropical regions. Tropical species may reach tree size. Roughly 500 species of genera Viola (violets, pansies) and Hybanthus (green violets) alone occur worldwide.

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Weeds

Weeds are plants growing where humans do not want them.

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Yew

Yew is the common name for evergreen conifers, genus Taxus, of the yew family (Taxaceae).

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Water Lily

A large family of freshwater plants known as the water lily (Nymphaeaceae) is characterized by large, shield-shaped leaves and showy blossoms. They are mostly tropical or subtropical. Four genera and 9 species are native to Canada, of which 3 species are important.

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Wintergreen

Wintergreen is the common name for smooth, low-growing, woodland, herbaceous plants in genus Pyrola of the wintergreen family (Pyrolaceae). These plants were known to the Cree as "beaver's ears" because of their small, round, evergreen leaves. Nine of the 12 known species are native to Canada.

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Wildflowers

There are approximately 4000 species of flowering plants in Canada, of which about 3000 may be considered wildflowers. About one-quarter of these have been introduced from other regions of the world.