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Article

Iglulingmuit

 In recent years settlement, social and logistic factors have eliminated the nomadic lifestyle in favour of aggregation into permanent settlements which have concentrated around Repulse Bay, Mittimatalik [Pond Inlet], Hall Beach, Arctic Bay and Iglulik, which were formerly centres of trade.

Article

Lois Miriam Wilson

Lois Miriam Wilson, née Freeman, United Church minister (b at Winnipeg 8 Apr 1927). Ordained after 15 years as a homemaker, Wilson shared team ministries with her husband, Roy, successively in Thunder Bay, Hamilton and Kingston, Ontario.

Article

Glenna Hansen

Glenna F. Hansen, Inuvialuit leader, businesswoman, health and education advocate, Commissioner of the Northwest Territories (b at Aklavik, 1956). Hansen was hired as an executive assistant by David Storr and Sons Contracting Ltd of Inuvik in 1990, and became general manager of the firm in 1996.

Article

Jens Haven

Jens Haven, founder of the Moravian mission in Labrador (b at Wust, Jutland, Denmark 23 June 1724; d at Herrnhut, Saxony [E Germany] 16 Apr 1796). After 10 years at the Moravian settlement at Herrnhut (1748-58), he was sent to the Inuit Mission in Greenland.

Article

Huguenots

Huguenots, a popular term used since 1560 to designate French Protestants, some of whom became involved in the Newfoundland fishery and Canadian fur trade, and in abortive colonization attempts in Canada (1541-42), Brazil (1555) and the Carolinas (1562-64).

Article

Jean-Baptiste de La Brosse

Jean-Baptiste de La Brosse (born at Magnac, France 1724; died at Qué 1782). Jean-Baptiste de La Brosse was a Jesuit missionary in the Saguenay-St Lawrence Gulf region. La Brosse is also a hero of folklore, remembered for having predicted his own death on 11 April 1782.

Article

Louis Lachance

Louis Lachance, priest, philosopher (b at St-Joachim de Montmorency, Qué 18 Feb 1899; d at Montréal 28 Oct 1963). His Nationalisme et religion (1936) provided the base for a nationalism based on reason - distinct from that advocated by Lionel GROULX which was based primarily on feeling.

Article

Algonquin

The Algonquin are Indigenous peoples that have traditionally occupied parts of western Quebec and Ontario, centring on the Ottawa River and its tributaries. Algonquin should not be confused with Algonquian, which refers to a larger linguistic and cultural group, including First Nations such as Innu and Cree. In the 2016 census, 40,880 people identified as having Algonquin ancestry.

Article

Alikomiak and Tatimagana

Alikomiak (also spelled Alekámiaq) and Tatimagana, Inuit hunters from the central Arctic, were the first Inuit to be condemned and executed for murder under Canadian law on 1 February 1924. The trials of Alikomiak and Tatimagana have been described as demonstrations of federal authority over the Inuit as well as of Canadian sovereignty in the Arctic.

Article

Basques

Basques were expert fishermen and sailors from the southeast corner of the Bay of Biscay. With the Portuguese, they were early arrivals to Newfoundland's Grand Banks.

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Bishop Emile Grouard

Monseigneur Émile Grouard was energetic and inventive, having steamboats built on the Peace, Slave and Athabasca rivers. He was also respected by the Indigenous peoples of his diocese, and came to learn the Cree, Denesuline (Chipewyan) and Dane-zaa (Beaver) languages.

Article

Nuu-chah-nulth (Nootka)

Nuu-chah-nulth (Nootka) are Indigenous peoples of the Pacific Northwest Coast in Canada. When explorer Captain James Cook encountered Nuu-chah-nulth villagers at Yuquot (Nootka Island, west of Vancouver Island) in 1778, he misunderstood the name for their nation to be Nootka, the term historically used to describe the Nuu-chah-nulth. The inlet where Cook first encountered the Nuu-chah-nulth is now known as Nootka Sound. In 1978, the Nuu-chah-nulth chose the collective term Nuu-chah-nulth (nuučaan̓uł, meaning “all along the mountains and sea”) to describe the First Nations of western Vancouver Island. In the 2016 census, 4,310 people identified as having Nuu-chah-nulth ancestry, 380 people reported the Nuu-chah-nulth language as their mother tongue.

Article

Northern Coast Salish

Northern Coast Salish peoples live along the northern half of the Strait of Georgia, east-central Vancouver Island and the western part of the mainland. Northern Coast Salish peoples include the Pentlatch, K’ómoks (Comox) and Shíshálh (Sechelt).

Article

Dane-zaa (Beaver)

Dane-zaa (also known as Dunne-za) are Dene-speaking people from the Peace River area of British Columbia and Alberta. Early explorers called them the Beaver people (named after a local group, the tsa-dunne), however the people call themselves Dane-zaa (meaning “real people” in their language). In the 2016 census, 1,705 people identified as having Dane-zaa ancestry, while 220 reported the Dane-zaa language as their mother tongue.

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Louis-Marie Régis

Louis-Marie Régis, priest, Thomist philosopher (b at Hébertville, Qué 8 Dec 1903; d at Montréal 2 Feb 1988). Régis was one of the most productive Catholic philosophers in Canada and one of the few whose work is well known in both languages.

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Michael Sabia (Profile)

In her day, the late Laura Sabia was never shy about poking establishment noses. Tart and outspoken, the founding president of the National Action Committee on the Status of Women in 1972 was a champion upender of the status quo.

Article

Charles Écuyer

Charles écuyer (or Ecuier). Priest, choirmaster, composer, baptized Montreal 20 Nov 1758, d Yamachiche, near Trois-Rivières, Lower Canada (Quebec), 29 May 1820. He was ordained in 1783.