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Displaying 61-80 of 342 results
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Turtle

Turtles are egg-laying, toothless reptiles with limb girdles roofed over by a wide rib cage and fused to bony plates in the skin.

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Bear Attacks

Infrequent attacks on humans have been made by grizzly (or brown), black or polar bears. Bears can run at speeds exceeding 50 km/h, are significantly stronger than people and can inflict serious injury.

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Bluebird

Bluebird is a common name for 3 species of thrushes occurring in North and Central America.

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Harvestmen

Harvestmen are Arachnids of the order Opiliones. Harvestmen is the preferred term but they are commonly called daddy-long-legs - even though many have short legs.

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Auk

Alcidae is a family of highly specialized seabirds that contains auks (including the now extinct great auk), auklets, murres, murrelets, razorbills, dovekies, guillemots and puffins.

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Beaver

A herbivorous mammal weighing 16–35 kg and measuring up to 1.3 m from snout to paddled tail, the beaver (Castor canadensis) is Canada's largest rodent and the second-largest rodent in the world (after the capybara). It is primarily nocturnal and lives a semi-aquatic life.

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Alderfly

Alderfly, small (13-18 mm), dark, soft-bodied insect of order Megaloptera, family Sialidae, found in freshwater habitats bordered by alder.

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Jaeger

The Jaeger is any of 3 species of rapacious, gull-like seabirds of genus Stercorarius.

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Marsupialia

Marsupialia, order of mammals belonging to the infraclass Metatheria, comprising some 280 living species, of which two-thirds are found in Australia.

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Marten

Marten (Martes americana), slender weasel specialized for life in the northern coniferous forests; found from Alaska and BC to Newfoundland and into the US.

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Kangaroo Rat

Kangaroo Rat, solitary, strictly nocturnal rodent of the N American family Heteromyidae. The family comprises 75 species (see Pocket Mouse).

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Mosquito

The mosquito (Spanish for "little fly") is a fragile, long-legged fly of the order Diptera, family Culicidae. Over 3,500 species are known worldwide and at least 82 are found in Canada. Often considered a nuisance to humans because of their itchy bites, it is the females that feed on the blood of other animals. Both sexes feed on plant fluids such as nectar. Most of the woodland species with which Canadians are familiar belong to the genus Aedes. These species are found throughout Canada and are recognizable by their alternating white and black colour, and slender, pointed abdomens. They are present in large numbers soon after winter’s end and on spring and summer evenings. The comparatively small northern house mosquito (Culex pipiens) is commonly found indoors in early spring and late fall, and is distinguished by its size and its blunt-tipped abdomen. Canada boasts the second oldest fossilized mosquito ever found. It is preserved in 76.5–79.5 million-year-old amber from southern Alberta.

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Perch

Although perch is the common name for several distantly related species of fish, it properly refers to members of the perch family (Percidae), order Perciformes, class Actinoperygii.

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Lynx

The lynx is a medium-sized, carnivorous mammal of family Felidae. Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis) is distinguished from the North American bobcat by its tufted ears, large feet, long legs and lack of a white patch below the tail tip.

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Leech

Leech (class Hirudinea) is a segmented annelid worm with 34 segments, many external rings and no setae (bristles).

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Damselfly

Damselfly, thin-bodied, carnivorous insect with 2 pairs of long, membranous, narrow-based wings.

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Lark

   Lark is a common name for small songbirds of the primarily Old World family Alaudidae.

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Marmot

The marmot is a large, diurnal, burrowing rodent of the squirrel family, native to Eurasia and North America.

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Cnidaria

Cnidaria, phylum of multicellular, radially symmetrical invertebrates (eg, hydroids, jellyfish, sea anemones, corals) dating to late Precambrian era (630-570 million years ago).

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