Search for "black history"

Displaying 81-100 of 142 results
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Slug

Slug is a common name for several terrestrial pulmonate and numerous marine gilled species of gastropod molluscs conspicuous by the lack of an exposed shell.

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Thrasher

Thrashers (Mimidae) are a small family of slender, long-tailed, medium-sized, insectivorous and frugivorous birds with loud, musical, repetitive songs.

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Waxwing

Waxwing is a family of birds comprising 8 species, including the true waxwings, the palmchat of Hispaniola and the silky-flycatchers of the southwestern US and Central America.

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Pelican

The Pelican family (Pelecanidae) consists of large water birds with long, flat bills, expandable throat pouches, and 4 toes connected by a web.

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Stickleback

Stickleback, of the fish family Gasterosteidae, occur in freshwater lakes and streams and in marine waters along northern coastlines of the northern hemisphere.

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Ptarmigan

Ptarmigan are distinguished from other members of the grouse subfamily by their all-white wings.

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Deer

Deer (Cervidae) is a family of antlered, hoofed ruminants of the order Artiodactyla containing about 40 species worldwide.

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Yellowjacket

Yellowjacket is the common name for wasps in the genera Vespula and Dolichovespula. They belong to the insect family Vespidae in the order Hymenoptera, which also includes other types of wasps such as hornets, as well as bees and ants. Worldwide, there are about 50 recognized species of yellowjacket, 17 of which are native to Canada. These native species include the common (Vespula alascensis), Eastern (V. maculifrons), Western (V. pensylvanica) and aerial (Dolichovespula arenaria) yellowjacket. One species, the German yellowjacket (V. germanica), is introduced to Canada and is especially common in Ontario and Quebec.

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Loon

Loon (family Gaviidae) is a common name for a distinctive group of 5 large, swimming birds, all confined to the Northern Hemisphere and all occurring in North America.

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Mountain Sheep

The mountain sheep is a highly successful, medium-sized, even-toed mammal (see Artiodactyla) of the cattle family (Bovidae), genus Ovis.

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Peregrine Falcon

The peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus) is a crow-sized, long-winged bird of prey, generally acknowledged to be the swiftest bird (attaining speeds of over 320 km/h).

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Murre

The term murre refers to 2 species, common murre (Uria aalge) and thick-billed murre (U. lomvia), the largest extant members of the auk family.

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Grebe

Grebe is the common name for members of the family Podicipedidae, aquatic birds with almost worldwide distribution.

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Cougar

Cougar, puma or mountain lion (Felis concolor, family Felidae), is the most gracile of the New World wild cats.

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Flatworm

Flatworm (Platyhelminthes), phylum of soft, bilaterally symmetrical invertebrates. Flatworms vary in shape from leaflike to ribbonlike; size ranges from microscopic to over 15 m long (some parasitic forms).

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Fisher

The Fisher (Martes pennanti) is a member of the weasel family, with a typically pointed face and rounded ears. In Canada, fishers live in the boreal and temperate forests of almost all the provinces and territories, with the exception of Newfoundland and Labrador and Prince Edward Island.

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Thrush

Thrushes (Muscicapidae) are a very large family comprising about 450 species of small passerines (perching birds) ranging 11-33 cm in length.

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Skunk

 The skunk is a carnivorous, cat-sized mammal. Skunks were previously considered as part of the weasel family (Mustelidae) but DNA research has placed them in their own family, Mephitidae.

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Raccoon

The common raccoon (Procyon lotor) is a mid-size mammal distinguished by its black face mask and ringed tail. It is a member of the Procyonidae, a primarily tropical family of omnivores native to the Americas — and the only one of this family found in Canada. Raccoons are found in every province except Newfoundland and Labrador. A nocturnal species, it is highly adaptable and can survive in urban areas as well as wilderness habitats. Humans often consider raccoons pests due to their skill and persistence in raiding garbage bins, gardens and crops for food.

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Moth

Moths are distinguished from butterflies by having threadlike or feathery antennae. Most are nocturnal. They vary in size from adults of some leaf miners with wings spreading little more than 3 mm to the Asian atlas moth, spreading 20 cm.