Search for "black history"

Displaying 1-20 of 61 results
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Coffee houses

Cafés that presented folk, blues and, occasionally, pop and jazz musicians. Like the boîte à chansons that was unique to French Canada, the coffee house - often in a converted house, a storefront or a church basement - was characterized by its limited seating capacity (an average of less than 100), informality, and intimacy

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The Crest Theatre

The Crest Theatre was founded in 1953 by Donald and Murray DAVIS with the support of their sister, Barbara CHILCOTT. As students, in the late 1940s, Donald and Murray had studied theatre under Robert Gill at the University of Toronto's Hart House Theatre.

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Belfry Theatre

The Belfry's history began in 1974, when University of Victoria graduate student Blair Shakel started making theatrical use of the unheated Springridge Chapel of the Emmanuel Baptist Church in the heart of the ailing Fernwood neighbourhood.

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Eglinton Theatre

The Eglinton Theatre, designed for cinema by Kaplan & Sprachman, architects, Toronto (1935-36), is one of the fullest interpretations of Art Deco styling in the mid-1930s in Canada.

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Vancouver Playhouse Theatre Company

The Vancouver Playhouse adopted the standard program pattern for regional theatres in Canada - a September to May season of about 6 plays that were mainly recent London and Broadway successes with a few classics included. From as early as 1966, every season featured at least one Canadian play.

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Music in Fredericton

Fredericton, NB. New Brunswick's capital city, located on the Saint John River on the site of a 1732 Acadian, and later Loyalist English, settlement at St Anne's Point. The name Fredericton was adopted in 1785. Incorporation as a city was accomplished in 1848.

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Festival Theatre

The term "festival theatre" emerged in England in the nineteenth century to refer to special theatrical performances mounted to celebrate exceptional authors or dates. The festival held in 1864 at Stratford-Upon-Avon, England, to mark the tercentenary of Shakespeare's birth is an early example.

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Music at Bishop's University

Bishop's University. Founded in 1843 in Lennoxville, near Sherbrooke, Que, by George Jehoshaphat Mountain, the third Anglican bishop of Quebec, as a liberal arts college. Its foundation was ratified by an act of the Quebec Legislative Assembly.

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Rainbow Stage

Rainbow Stage, named for its rainbow-shaped proscenium arch, opened with a variety show directed by Duncan on 7 July 1954. In September 1955 Duncan directed the first musical comedy performed there, Brigadoon, which marked the beginning of a tradition.

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Music at Western University

The Faculty of Music at Western University (known legally as the University of Western Ontario) offers a full range of undergraduate and graduate degree programs. Located in London, Ontario, it is one of the largest music schools in Canada.

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Music in Guelph

Guelph, Ont. Founded 1827 by John Galt in the heart of agricultural Ontario and incorporated in 1879. In 1846 there were 1240 people living in Guelph. By 1988 the population had reached 80,786 including a large Italian.community.

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Music in Lunenburg

Seaport community founded in 1753 on the south shore of Nova Scotia by German, Swiss, Huguenot, and British settlers at a site known previously as Malagash. In 1986 its population was 2972.