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Gander River

Gander River, 175 km long, drainage basin 6400 km2, is the principal river of northeast Newfoundland, emptying into Gander Bay. Named for its abundant geese, it rises in the central plateau and eventually falls 427 m to the Atlantic.

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Rivière Eastmain

The Rivière Eastmain, 756 km long, rises in the central part of Québec on the side of a low drainage divide from which streams flow west to James Bay.

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Rivière Dumoine

The Dumoine, 129 km long, rises in Lac Dumoine in southwest Québec and flows off the south edge of the Laurentian Highlands through a series of waterfalls, wild rapids and long chutes into the Ottawa River.

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Drainage Basin

A drainage basin is an area of land that contributes the water it receives as precipitation to a river or network of rivers.

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Coppermine River

The Coppermine River, 845 km long, rises in the Barren Lands of the Northwest Territories in Lac de Gras and flows northwest through Point Lake to Coronation Gulf on the Arctic Ocean. The majority of its course lies in Nunavut.

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Detroit River

The Detroit River, 52 km long, flows south from Lake ST CLAIR to the west end of Lake ERIE, forming part of the boundary between Ontario and Michigan. Detroit, Michigan, and WINDSOR, Ontario, dominate its shores. Part of the ST LAWRENCE SEAWAY, it is heavily used by commercial traffic.

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Dubawnt River

Dubawnt River, 842 km long, rises from a web of lakes in the Northwest Territories, 120 km northeast of Lake Athabasca

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Clearwater River

Clearwater River, 280 km long, rises in Patterson, Forest and Lloyd lakes in northwest Saskatchewan, flows southeast to Careen Lake and abruptly turns west to join the ATHABASCA RIVER at Fort McMurray, Alberta.

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Horton River

 The Horton River, 618 km long, rises north of GREAT BEAR LAKE in the Northwest Territories and empties into Amundsen Gulf. Shallowly entrenched in the upper part of its course, it cuts a deep (up to 200 m) valley into the soft Cretaceous bedrock in its lower course.

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Athabasca River

The Athabasca River is the longest river in Alberta (1,538 km). The first 168 km (located in Jasper National Park) are designated as a Canadian Heritage River. As a tributary to the Mackenzie River, water flowing on the Athabasca River eventually drains into the Arctic Ocean. River flow is highest during the summer and lowest during winter, and it is ice-covered from mid-November to mid-April.

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Bow River

​The Bow River runs through the most populated region of Alberta, intersecting cities such as Banff, Canmore, Cochrane and Calgary.

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French River

The French River, 290 km long (to head of Sturgeon River), rises from Lake Nipissing in northeastern Ontario and flows 110 km west towards Georgian Bay.

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Rivière Saint-Maurice

Rivière Saint-Maurice, 563 km long, rises upstream from Réservoir Gouin, 200 km west of Lac Saint-Jean, Québec. It drains a basin of 43 300 km2. After its confluence with Rivière Manouane, it feeds Réservoir Blanc and then takes in the Vermillon, Trenche, Croche, Mattawin and Mékinac rivers.

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Rivière Chaudière

Rivière Chaudière, 193 km long and with a basin 6690 km2, is located in southern Québec. It is named after the waters that "boil" from its falls or after the numerous glacial erosion kettles (chaudière is French for boiler and also for bucket).

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Rivière Koksoak

Koksoak, Rivière, 874 km long (to head of Caniapiscau River), final leg of a river system that drains a vast area (133 000 km2) of northern Québec.

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Yukon River

At 3,185 km (1,149 km of which lie in Canada), the Yukon River is the fifth-longest river in North America.

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Dean River

Dean River, 241 km long, world-famous steelhead- and salmon-fishing stream, rises in the Fraser Plateau of west-central BC, flows northwest and west through the COAST MOUNTAINS and empties near the head of Dean Channel.

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Kazan River

Kazan River, 850 km long, rises near Kasba Lake in southern Nunavut near the Saskatchewan border. Flowing north it follows an irregular course through several lakes, draining a large part of the Barren Lands.

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