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Bloodvein River

Named, perhaps, for the red granite stripes running through the bedrock near its source, the Bloodvein River begins in the vast wilderness of the Canadian Shield, 600 km northwest of Thunder Bay, Ont, and 500 km northeast of Winnipeg.

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Shelburne River

One of the last wilderness rivers in Nova Scotia, the Shelburne River begins in the Tobeatic Wilderness Area, the largest remaining wilderness in the Maritimes.

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Seal River

Named for the harbour seals (normally marine creatures) that are found up to 200 km upstream from Hudson Bay, Manitoba's Seal River is formed by the confluence of the North Seal (about 200 km long) and the South Seal (about 240 km long) rivers at Shethanei Lake.

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Rideau River

The Rideau River flows 100 km northwards from the Rideau Lakes in eastern Ontario to the Ottawa River at Ottawa.

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Hillsborough River

The Hillsborough River begins near the white sand beaches of the north shore and winds 45 km through rich farm country to its mouth (Charlottetown Harbour) on the south shore of Prince Edward Island. At its mouth, the North and West rivers come together to meet the Hillsborough.

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Soper River

The Soper River winds southwards 108 km through the tundra-covered hills of southern Baffin Island before emptying into Soper Lake, a brackish water body, and then directly into Hudson Strait near the community of Kimmirut, Nunavut.

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Nass River

Nass River is 380 km long, rises in the northern interior of BC and flows generally southwest, draining approximately 20 700 km2, to reach the Pacific at Portland Inlet. Its major tributaries are the Bell-Irving, Meziadin and Cranberry rivers.

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Grand River

From its source just south of Georgian Bay, the Grand River winds 266 km to Lake Erie, dropping 352 m along the way. Together with its major tributaries, the Speed, Nith, Conestogo and Eramosa rivers, it drains 6200 km2, the largest watershed in southern Ontario.

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Humber River (Ontario)

Encompassing 908 km2 in total, the Humber River watershed is the largest in the Toronto region. The 126-kilometre long Humber River has its headwaters in the ancient rock of the NIAGARA ESCARPMENT and the glacial hills of the Oak Ridges Moraine.

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North Saskatchewan River

​The North Saskatchewan River (1,287 km long, the first 48.5 km of which is designated as a Canadian Heritage River) is a major tributary to the Saskatchewan River, which ultimately flows into Hudson Bay. The mean annual flow is 241 m3/s; however, flow varies between the peak in July and minimum in February. It served as a major transportation route from the end of the last Ice Age through the mid-20th century.

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South Saskatchewan River

​The South Saskatchewan River (1,392 km long) is a heavily utilized water source in southern Alberta and Saskatchewan and is a major tributary to the Saskatchewan River, ultimately discharging to Hudson Bay. Mean flow is 280 m3/s, but varies throughout the year, largely controlled by several dams and reservoirs along the river system. The South Saskatchewan River flows through an agriculturally productive region and is prone to periodic droughts and floods.

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Gold River

Gold River, BC, incorporated as a village in 1972, population 1267 (2011c), 1362 (2006c). The Village of Gold River is located approximately midpoint on the west coast of VANCOUVER ISLAND at the head of Muchalat Inlet in NOOTKA SOUND.

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George River

George River, 560 km long, in northern Québec, drains N into the E side of Ungava Bay. Its southern and eastern divides, along with those of tributary rivers Ford and De Pas, extend along much of the Québec-Newfoundland and Labrador border.

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Mattawa River

The Mattawa River rises in Trout Lake in north-central Ontario, 198.5 m above sea level, and drops 50 m over the 54 km distance to the Ottawa River.

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Harrison River

Harrison River, 15 km long, flows SW from Harrison Lk to join the Fraser River about 100 km upriver from Vancouver in southern BC.

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Back River

Back River, 974 km long, rises in Contwoyto Lake, north of Great Slave Lake, NWT, and flows northeast across the Barren Lands of Nunavut to Chantrey Inlet, south of King William Island.

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Nelson River

The Nelson River, 2,575 km long, flows north northeast out of Playgreen Lake, at the northwest tip of Lake Winnipeg. It spills out into a number of lakes, including Cross, Sipiwesk, Split and Stevens, flowing east from the latter into Hudson Bay.

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Rivière Moisie

Rivière Moisie, 410 km long, rises in eastern Québec from Lac Opocopa and flows south to the St. Lawrence River. With a drainage basin of 19,200 km2 and a mean discharge of 490 m3/s, it is the river of greatest volume along the middle north Shore of the St. Lawrence.