Search for "south asian canadians"

Displaying 1-20 of 40 results
Article

South Nahanni River

South Nahanni River, 563 km long, flows southeast out of the Ragged Range of the Selwyn Mountains, cuts across successive spines of the Mackenzie Mountains and empties into the Liard River.

Article

South Saskatchewan River

​The South Saskatchewan River (1,392 km long) is a heavily utilized water source in southern Alberta and Saskatchewan and is a major tributary to the Saskatchewan River, ultimately discharging to Hudson Bay. Mean flow is 280 m3/s, but varies throughout the year, largely controlled by several dams and reservoirs along the river system. The South Saskatchewan River flows through an agriculturally productive region and is prone to periodic droughts and floods.

Article

Red Deer River

The Red Deer River (740 km, mean annual flow rate 62 m3/s), is glacier-fed by streams from Mount Drummond and Cyclone Mountain in the Rockies of Banff National Park in Alberta. It flows east then south to join the South SASKATCHEWAN RIVER just inside Saskatchewan.

Article

Thompson River

Thompson River, 489 km long, rises in the Cariboo district of the Rocky Mountains and flows south as the North Thompson River.

Article

Rivière Manicouagan

The Rivière Manicouagan, 560 km long, rises in east-central Québec near the Labrador border and flows south through the Réservoir Manicouagan to the St Lawrence River near Baie-Comeau.

Article

Back River

Back River, 974 km long, rises in Contwoyto Lake, north of Great Slave Lake, NWT, and flows northeast across the Barren Lands of Nunavut to Chantrey Inlet, south of King William Island.

Article

Skeena River

Skeena River, 580 km long, rises in the northern interior of BC and flows generally SW, draining about 54 000 km2, to meet the Pacific Ocean at Chatham Sound south of Prince Rupert.

Article

Rivière Dumoine

The Dumoine, 129 km long, rises in Lac Dumoine in southwest Québec and flows off the south edge of the Laurentian Highlands through a series of waterfalls, wild rapids and long chutes into the Ottawa River.

Article

Arctic Red River

The Arctic Red River flows 499 km north-northwest from glaciers in the North Mackenzie Mountains, crossing 4 mountain ranges before it winds its way through the Mackenzie Lowlands, crossing the Arctic Circle and joining the MACKENZIE RIVER just south of the Mackenzie River Delta.

Article

Grand River

From its source just south of Georgian Bay, the Grand River winds 266 km to Lake Erie, dropping 352 m along the way. Together with its major tributaries, the Speed, Nith, Conestogo and Eramosa rivers, it drains 6200 km2, the largest watershed in southern Ontario.

Article

Saskatchewan River

The Saskatchewan River is 1,939 km long from the Rocky Mountains headwaters to Cedar Lake in central Manitoba. When including its longest tributary, the South Saskatchewan River, the Saskatchewan River is the fourth-longest river in Canada. It’s a major tributary to the Nelson River, ultimately draining into Hudson Bay. Its name is derived from the Cree word kisiskâciwanisîpiy meaning swift-flowing river. The Saskatchewan River was a major transportation route for First Nations for thousands of years and was an instrumental transportation and resource corridor during the fur trade and early European exploration.

Article

Seal River

Named for the harbour seals (normally marine creatures) that are found up to 200 km upstream from Hudson Bay, Manitoba's Seal River is formed by the confluence of the North Seal (about 200 km long) and the South Seal (about 240 km long) rivers at Shethanei Lake.

Article

Stikine River

The Stikine River, 539 km long, rises in the Spatsizi Wilderness Park in northwestern British Columbia and flows in a wide arc north and west out of the Stikine Plateau uplands, then south through the spectacular Coast Mountains range to meet the Pacific Ocean near Wrangell, Alaska.

Article

Detroit River

The Detroit River, 52 km long, flows south from Lake ST CLAIR to the west end of Lake ERIE, forming part of the boundary between Ontario and Michigan. Detroit, Michigan, and WINDSOR, Ontario, dominate its shores. Part of the ST LAWRENCE SEAWAY, it is heavily used by commercial traffic.

Article

Hillsborough River

The Hillsborough River begins near the white sand beaches of the north shore and winds 45 km through rich farm country to its mouth (Charlottetown Harbour) on the south shore of Prince Edward Island. At its mouth, the North and West rivers come together to meet the Hillsborough.

Article

Rivière Moisie

Rivière Moisie, 410 km long, rises in eastern Québec from Lac Opocopa and flows south to the St. Lawrence River. With a drainage basin of 19,200 km2 and a mean discharge of 490 m3/s, it is the river of greatest volume along the middle north Shore of the St. Lawrence.

Article

Toronto Feature: Mimico Creek

This text is from the free Toronto in Time app, which was created by The Canadian Encyclopedia and is available from the App Store and the Google Play store. Visit its companion website, which is linked below, to explore all the features of the app online.

Article

Drainage Basin

A drainage basin is an area of land that contributes the water it receives as precipitation to a river or network of rivers.

Article

Kazan River

Kazan River, 850 km long, rises near Kasba Lake in southern Nunavut near the Saskatchewan border. Flowing north it follows an irregular course through several lakes, draining a large part of the Barren Lands.

Article

Peace River

Peace River, 1,923 km long, is one of the principal tributaries of the Mackenzie River system. The name of the river refers to a settlement between Cree and Dane-Zaa (Beaver) warring parties around 1781 at Peace Point at the lower portion of the river. The Dane-Zaa word for the river is unchaga, meaning “big river”; the Cree word for the settlement there is sâkitawâhk.