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Moose River

The Moose River is 547 km long from the head of its tributary, the Mattagami River. It is formed by the confluence of the Mattagami and the Missinaibi rivers, and flows northeast 104 km to discharge into the bottom of James Bay in northern Ontario.

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Coppermine River

The Coppermine River, 845 km long, rises in the Barren Lands of the Northwest Territories in Lac de Gras and flows northwest through Point Lake to Coronation Gulf on the Arctic Ocean. The majority of its course lies in Nunavut.

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Fraser River

The Fraser River is the longest river in British Columbia, stretching 1,375 km. It begins on the western side of the Rocky Mountains at Mount Robson Provincial Park, and ends in the Strait of Georgia at Vancouver. Named for explorer Simon Fraser, the river was a transportation route and source of food for the Indigenous people of the region long before Fraser travelled its waters. In 1858, gold was discovered on sandbars south of Yale, setting off the Fraser River Gold rush.

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Hayes River

The Hayes River, 483 km long, rises in Molson Lake (399 km2) northeast of Lake Winnipeg, flows northeast to Oxford Lake (401 km2) and Knee Lake, through the rock and bush of the Canadian Shield, across the clay flats of the Hudson Bay Lowlands and into the bay at YORK FACTORY.

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Restigouche River

Restigouche River (Ristigouche in Québec), 200 km long, rises in the highlands of northwestern New Brunswick as the Little Main Restigouche River.

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Columbia River

The Columbia River runs from the southeast corner of British Columbia through Washington and Oregon states to the Pacific Ocean.

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Milk River

WRITING-ON-STONE PROVINCIAL PARK and a natural area in Alberta protect parts of the river's remarkable landscapes. The American explorers Meriwether Lewis and William Clark gave the Milk River its name (in 1805) because its colour reminded them of a cup of tea mixed with milk.

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Saint John River

Saint John River, 673 km long, rises in northern Maine and flows northeast into the forests of Madawaska County to Edmundston, where it is joined by the Madawaska River and turns southeast, forming much of the border between Maine and New Brunswick.

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Toronto Feature: Humber Marshes

This text is from the free Toronto in Time app, which was created by The Canadian Encyclopedia and is available from the App Store and the Google Play store. Visit its companion website, which is linked below, to explore all the features of the app online.

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Yukon River

At 3,185 km (1,149 km of which lie in Canada), the Yukon River is the fifth-longest river in North America.

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North Saskatchewan River

​The North Saskatchewan River (1,287 km long, the first 48.5 km of which is designated as a Canadian Heritage River) is a major tributary to the Saskatchewan River, which ultimately flows into Hudson Bay. The mean annual flow is 241 m3/s; however, flow varies between the peak in July and minimum in February. It served as a major transportation route from the end of the last Ice Age through the mid-20th century.

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Rideau River

The Rideau River flows 100 km northwards from the Rideau Lakes in eastern Ontario to the Ottawa River at Ottawa.

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Bow River

​The Bow River runs through the most populated region of Alberta, intersecting cities such as Banff, Canmore, Cochrane and Calgary.

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Red River

The Red River (880 km long) begins at the confluence of the Bois de Sioux and Otter Tail rivers at the border between Minnesota and North Dakota. It then flows north through southern Manitoba and into Lake Winnipeg. The last 175 km of the Red River, the portion located in Manitoba, is designated as a Canadian Heritage River due to its cultural and historical value. The Red River flows through a productive agricultural region that is prone to both drought and severe flooding — the largest flood in the area in recent history, coined “the flood of the century,” occurred in 1997. The river’s basin was once the bottom of a glacial lake, Lake Agassiz, which covered the region 8,000 years ago. Currently, the Red River provides water for municipal, industrial and agricultural uses, and offers numerous summer and winter recreational opportunities, including boating, fishing (including ice fishing), camping and skating.

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St. Lawrence Seaway

The St Lawrence Seaway (Great Lakes Waterway) is the system of locks, canals and channels linking the Great Lakes and the St Lawrence River with the Atlantic Ocean.