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Fort Anne

For the next 40 years, the British at Fort Anne maintained a precarious position in the Acadian-dominated province and were frequently attacked by French and Indian raiding parties. The status of the fort declined with the founding of Halifax (1749) and the expulsion of the Acadians (1755).

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Fort Beauséjour

Fort Beauséjour, on the west bank of the Missaguash River near present-day Sackville, New Brunswick was built 1751-55 by the French as a counter to nearby British Fort Lawrence (near Amherst, NS).

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Fort Calgary

Fort Calgary, located at the junction of the Bow and Elbow rivers on the site of the present-day city of Calgary, was established in 1875 as a North-West Mounted Police post by Ephrem-A. Brisebois, one of the original officers of the force.

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Fort Haldimand

Fort Haldimand, located on the west promontory of Carleton Island at the east end of Lake Ontario, about 16 km offshore from Kingston, Ontario, was built by the British in 1778 during the American Revolution.

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Fort Amherst

Fort Amherst, on the west shore of Charlottetown Harbour, PEI, was built in late 1758 by the British. The site had been known previously as Port La Joie, established in 1720 as the capital of the French colony of Île Saint-Jean.

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Fort Ticonderoga

Fort Ticonderoga (Carillon), a "place between the waters," is strategically situated at the confluence of Lakes Champlain and George in upper New York.

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Fort Vancouver

Fort Vancouver, a HUDSON'S BAY CO fur-trade post, was originally constructed in 1825 by Dr. John McLoughlin about 150 km inland on the north bank of the Columbia River, 8 km above the mouth of the Willamette. In 1829, the

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Fort Whoop-Up

Fort Whoop-Up, situated at the junction of the Belly (now Oldman) and St Mary rivers, near present-day Lethbridge, Alberta, was established in 1869 by John J. Healy and Alfred B. Hamilton of Montana.

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Upper Fort Garry

Upper Fort Garry, situated at the forks of the Red and Assiniboine rivers in the heart of the Red River Colony, was a Hudson's Bay Company post established in 1822. Previous fur-trade posts had been located periodically in the area.

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Fort Battleford

When the settlement of Battleford, in what is now west-central Saskatchewan, was named the capital of the North-West Territories in 1876, the North-West Mounted Police established a post to deal with anticipated problems with Indigenous people.

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Fort Carlton

Fort Carlton, situated on the south branch of the North Saskatchewan River near Duck Lake (Saskatchewan), was established in 1810 as a Hudson's Bay Company fur trade and provision post.

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Fort Frontenac

Frontenac reoccupied the site, rebuilding the fort in 1695, and the post became known as Fort Frontenac. Reinforced by troops under François-Charles de Bourlamaque and later the Marquis de MONTCALM, it nevertheless fell to the British under John Bradstreet in August 1758.

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Fort Edmonton

Fort Edmonton was established on the Northern Saskatchewan River in 1795 by the Hudson's Bay Company as a fortified trading post next to the rival North West Company, which had earlier built its own fort nearby.

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Fort Duquesne

Fort Duquesne, located at the confluence of the Allegheny and Monongahela Rivers at the site of present-day Pittsburgh, Penn, guarded the most important strategic location in the west at the time of the Seven Years' War.

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Heritage Trail

Hundreds of trails are now found from coast to coast in Canada, installed and run by national and provincial parks, the Canadian Wildlife Service, tourist departments, conservation authorities, museums, universities, schools, botanical gardens and private agencies.

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Fort Henry

Fort Henry, KINGSTON, Ont, was originally built during the WAR OF 1812 on Point Henry, beside Lake Ontario, to guard the outlet to the St Lawrence River and the Kingston Navy Yards.

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Louisbourg

In the 18th century, Louisbourg was a fortified town and an important strategic capital in the French colony of Île Royale (Cape Breton Island). It was the scene of two major military sieges in the Anglo-French wars for supremacy in North America. The fall of Louisbourg to the British in 1758 paved the way for the capture of Québec and the end of French rule in North America. Today, Louisbourg is a national historic site and a popular tourist destination in Cape Breton.