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Displaying 121-140 of 141 results
Article

Spiritwood

The town is a service and administrative centre for the surrounding area. Grain growing and the raising of livestock are the main activities. The town lies in close proximity to a number of lakes and parks, with many recreational opportunities including fishing, snowmobiling, hunting and golfing.

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Nakusp

Nakusp, British Columbia, incorporated as a village in 1964, population 1,605 (2016 census), 1,569 (2011 census). The village of Nakusp is located on the east shore of Upper Arrow Lake at the foot of the Selkirk Mountains. It is in the West Kootenay district of south-eastern British Columbia. Nakusp is located on the traditional territory of the Sinixt, Ktunaxa, Secwepemc and Okanagan peoples. (See also Interior Salish.) The name is derived from a Sinixt word, though its meaning is debated. One interpretation is that the name Nakusp comes from a word meaning “the bay behind the long point,” another is that it means, “closed-in” or “safe.”

Article

Stadacona

Stadacona was an Iroquoian village located at the present site of Quebec City, Quebec. It had an estimated population of about 500. French navigator Jacques Cartier was led to the village on his second voyage in 1535 and wintered at a safe distance, across the St-Charles River.

Article

St. Jacobs

St. Jacobs, ON, established as a Police Village in 1904 and dissolved as such in 1972 under the Regional Municipality of Waterloo Act (1972), population 1,891 (2011c), 1,597 (2006c).

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Manning

Manning, Alta, incorporated as a village in 1951 and as a town in 1957, population 1164 (2011c), 1493 (2006c). The Town of Manning lies beside the Notikewin River, 73 km north of the town of PEACE RIVER.

Article

St Pierre-Jolys

St-Pierre-Jolys, Manitoba, incorporated as a village in 1947, population 1099 (2011c), 839 (2006c). The Village of St-Pierre-Jolys is located 56 km southeast of WINNIPEG near the Rat River.

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Kaslo

Kaslo, BC, incorporated as a village in 1959, population 1026 (2011c), 1072 (2006c). The Village of Kaslo is located 70 km north of Nelson, overlooking KOOTENAY LAKE. It was established in 1892 to service the silver-mining boom sweeping the Kootenays. The origin of the name is unclear.

Article

Cavendish

 Established in 1790 by Scottish immigrants, Cavendish was originally a farming community. With the 1930s' establishment of the national park, TOURISM has become the community's principal employer. It was in Cavendish that novelist and native Lucy Maud MONTGOMERY wrote ANNE OF GREEN GABLES.

Article

Kugluktuk

Kugluktuk, Nunavut, incorporated as a hamlet in 1981, population 1,491 (2016 census), population 1,450 (2011 census). The Hamlet of Kugluktuk, formerly known as Coppermine, is situated west of the mouth of the Coppermine River on the mainland Arctic coast. The hamlet changed its name in 1996 to Kugluktuk, which means "place of rapids," referring to the rapids at Bloody Falls, 15 km upstream.

Article

Falher

Falher, Alberta, incorporated as a village in 1923 and as a town in 1955, population 1,047 (2016 census), 1,075 (2011 census). The Town of Falher is located south of Peace River. It was named for Father Constant Falher, a Roman Catholic priest.

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Teslin

Teslin, Yukon, incorporated as a village in 1984, population 124 (2016 census), 122 (2011 census). The village of Teslin is located on Teslin Lake at the mouth of the Nisutlin River. It is on the Alaska Highway, 183 km by road southeast of Whitehorse.

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Tsiigehtchic

Tsiigehtchic, Northwest Territories, population 187 (2019). Tsiigehtchic is located at the confluence of the  Mackenzie and Arctic Red rivers. It is home to the Gwichya Gwich’in First Nation (“people of the flat lands”) who speak an Athapaskan language (see Indigenous Languages in Canada). Formerly known as Arctic Red River, the community’s name was changed to Tsiigehtchic (“at the mouth of iron river”) in 1994. The community is on the Dempster Highway. It is accessible by summer ferry across the Mackenzie River and in winter by ice road. Tsiigehtchic is one of four communities in the Gwich’in Settlement Region. The region is an area created by the Gwich’in Comprehensive Land Claim Agreement (1992). The other three communities in the region are AklavikFort McPherson and Inuvik. (See also Dinjii Zhuh (Gwich'in).)

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Fort McPherson

Fort McPherson, Northwest Territories, population 741 (2020). The hamlet of Fort McPherson is located on the right bank of the Peel River, on the Dempster Highway. It is west of the Mackenzie River and east of the Richardson Mountains. Fort McPherson is called Teetł’it Zheh (“head of the waters-town”) in Gwich’in, an Athapaskan language (see Indigenous Languages in Canada). The hamlet is home to the Teetł’it Gwich’in First Nation (“people of the headwaters”). Fort McPherson is one of four communities in the Gwich’in Settlement Region. The region is an area created by the Gwich’in Comprehensive Land Claim Agreement (1992). The other three communities in the region are Aklavik, Tsiigehtchic and Inuvik.

Article

Prud'homme

Prud'homme, Saskatchewan, incorporated as a village in 1922, population 167 (2016 census), 172 (2011 census). The village of Prud'homme is located about 45 km northeast of Saskatoon. Prud'homme is the hometown of Jeanne Sauvé, a former cabinet minister in the Pierre Trudeau government, the first woman to hold the position of Speaker of the House of Commons and the first woman to act as Governor General of Canada.