Search for "south asian canadians"

Displaying 21-37 of 37 results
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Tagish (Yukon)

The name Tagish apparently comes from "Ta-Gish-Ai", a word for "fish trap" and the name of the local First Nations band.

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Valleyview

Valleyview, Alta, incorporated as a village in 1954 and as a town in 1957, population 1761 (2011c), 1725 (2006c). The Town of Valleyview is located 105 km east of GRANDE PRAIRIE. The first homesteaders took up land in the area in the late 1910s and the district was called Red Willow.

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Kaslo

Kaslo, BC, incorporated as a village in 1959, population 1026 (2011c), 1072 (2006c). The Village of Kaslo is located 70 km north of Nelson, overlooking KOOTENAY LAKE. It was established in 1892 to service the silver-mining boom sweeping the Kootenays. The origin of the name is unclear.

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New Denver

New Denver, British Columbia, incorporated as a village in 1929, population 473 (2016 census), 504 (2011 census). The village of New Denver is located near the northeastern end of Slocan Lake, 100 km north of Nelson. The site was first called Eldorado, then New Denver (1892), after Denver, Colorado.

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Manning

Manning, Alta, incorporated as a village in 1951 and as a town in 1957, population 1164 (2011c), 1493 (2006c). The Town of Manning lies beside the Notikewin River, 73 km north of the town of PEACE RIVER.

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Fort Providence

Fort Providence, NWT, incorporated as a hamlet in 1987, population 734 (2011c), 727 (2006c). The Hamlet of Fort Providence is located on the northeast bank of the MACKENZIE RIVER, 233 km southwest of YELLOWKNIFE.

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Tadoussac

Tadoussac, Quebec, incorporated as a village in 1899, population 799 (2016 census), 813 (2011 census). Tadoussac is located at the confluence of the Saguenay and St. Lawrence rivers, 210 km northeast of Quebec City. In the Innu language, Totouskak means "breasts," a reference to the rounded hills found near the village.

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Beaverlodge

Beaverlodge, AB, incorporated as a village in 1929 and as a town in 1956, population 2365 (2011c), 2264 (2006c).

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St Pierre-Jolys

St-Pierre-Jolys, Manitoba, incorporated as a village in 1947, population 1099 (2011c), 839 (2006c). The Village of St-Pierre-Jolys is located 56 km southeast of WINNIPEG near the Rat River.

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Coral Harbour

Coral Harbour, Nunavut, incorporated as a hamlet in 1972, population 891 (2016 census), 834 (2011 census). The hamlet of Coral Harbour is located at the head of South Bay on Southampton Island in Hudson Bay, 715 km southeast of Iqaluit. The name Coral Harbour is descriptive and refers to the fossilized coral in its harbour. The Inuit’s traditional name for the site and the island, Salliq, is also descriptive and means “flat island.”

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Ashcroft

Ashcroft, BC, incorporated as a village in 1952, population 1628 (2011c), 1664 (2006c). The Village of Ashcroft is situated on a flat bench above the Thompson River in the dry belt of the interior of southern British Columbia, about 90 km west of Kamloops.

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Notre Dame de Lourdes

Notre Dame de Lourdes, Manitoba, incorporated as a village in 1963, population 683 (2011c), 589 (2006c). The Village of Notre Dame de Lourdes is situated on the northeast slope of the Pembina Hills, 130 km southwest of WINNIPEG.

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Sandon

Silver was found in 1891 and a rush followed, with thousands of prospectors staking the silver-bearing slopes. By 1895 Sandon was a thriving town and the terminus of 2 railways.

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Yorkton

 Although the York colony eventually faded, large numbers of immigrants from across Europe settled in the area. Of particular significance were the early UKRAINIANS and DOUKHOBORS who formed a large portion of the population.

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Nakusp

Nakusp, British Columbia, incorporated as a village in 1964, population 1,605 (2016 census), 1,569 (2011 census). The village of Nakusp is located on the east shore of Upper Arrow Lake at the foot of the Selkirk Mountains. It is in the West Kootenay district of south-eastern British Columbia. Nakusp is located on the traditional territory of the Sinixt, Ktunaxa, Secwepemc and Okanagan peoples. (See also Interior Salish.) The name is derived from a Sinixt word, though its meaning is debated. One interpretation is that the name Nakusp comes from a word meaning “the bay behind the long point,” another is that it means, “closed-in” or “safe.”

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Sylvan Lake

Sylvan Lake, Alberta, incorporated as a village in 1913 and as a town in 1946, population 14,816 (2016 census), 12,362 (2011 census). The town of Sylvan Lake is located on the south shore of the lake of the same name in central Alberta, approximately 20 km west of Red Deer. The origin of the name is descriptive. The area was once heavily forested and the name is based on the Latin word sylva, which means wood or forest. The lake was known variously as Snake (by the Cree and Stoney-Nakoda), and Methy or Swan (by 19th century explorers). In 1909, a local resident, Mrs. Green, circulated a petition to change the lake’s name to Sylvan Lake.