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Mark McMorris

Mark Lee McMorris, Canadian snowboarder (born 9 December 1993 in Regina, Saskatchewan). McMorris competes in both big air and slopestyle snowboarding. He won the bronze medal for Canada in men’s slopestyle at the 2014 Olympic Winter Games in Sochi and the 2018 Olympic Winter Games in PyeongChang, as well as silver in men’s slopestyle at the 2013 FIS Snowboarding World Championships. He has also won multiple gold medals on the World Cup circuit and at the Winter X Games, Dew Tour and the Burton US Open Snowboarding Championships.

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Alexander Wilson

Alexander Sheldon Wilson (born at Montréal, Que 1 Dec 1907; died at Hidalgo, Tex 9 Dec 1994). Alex Wilson was a sprinter who wore the Canadian colours in the 1928 and 1932 Summer Olympics in track and field.

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Chris Williamson

Chris Williamson, Paralympic alpine skier (born 5 May 1972 in Edmonton, Alberta). Williamson competed in four Paralympic Winter Games over the course of his 17-year career, winning four medals, including gold in the men’s slalom at the 2002 Paralympic Winter Games in Salt Lake City. He also dominated the International Paralympic Committee (IPC) World Cup competition, winning 56 gold medals (105 medals in total), 14 titles in individual disciplines, and 8 Crystal Globes. At the IPC Alpine Skiing World Championships, Williamson won two gold medals and 14 medals overall. He retired from competition in 2015.

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Alex Harvey

Alex Harvey, (born at Saint-Ferréol-les-Neiges, QC, 7 Sep 1988). Athlete Alex Harvey participated in the winter Olympic Games and made his mark on the World Cup circuit in cross-country skiing.

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Émilie Heymans

A 6 time PAN AMERICAN medallist and 3 time OLYMPIC GAMES medallist, success began early for Heymans, who had won 30 national titles by the time she was 19.

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Perdita Felicien

Perdita Felicien, track and field hurdler (born 29 August 1980 in Oshawa, ON). Perdita Felicien is the first Canadian woman to win an individual medal in track at the IAAF World Championships.

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Stan Mikita

Stan "Stosh" Mikita, hockey player (b at Sokolce, Czech 20 May 1940; died 7 August 2018). Born Stanislaus Gvoth, he took the name of his uncle after moving to St Catharines as a boy. He played junior hockey for the St Catharines Teepees and joined the Chicago Black Hawks for his first NHL season in 1959-60.

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Marc Gagnon

Marc Gagnon, speed skater (born 24 May 1975 in Chicoutimi, QC). Gagnon won five medals at the Olympic Winter Games from 1994 to 2002.

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Kevin Martin

Kevin Martin, curler (born at Killam, Alta, 31 Jul 1966). Kevin Martin took up curling early in life, playing in Edmonton, Alta, and won the Canadian Junior Championship in 1985 at the age of 19.

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Sandra Schmirler

Sandra Marie Schmirler, curler (born at Biggar, Sask 11 Jun 1963; died at Regina 2 Mar 2000). Sandra Schmirler, dubbed "Schmirler the Curler," was considered by many to be the best female curler in the world in 1998 when she led her foursome to the first ever OLYMPIC gold medal in the sport.

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Lucien Laverdure

Lucien Laverdure, coach, promoter, entrepreneur (b at Montréal 25 Sep 1915; d there 25 Dec 1976). Lucien Laverdure picked up a TENNIS racquet for the first time at around the age of 12 at the Collège Mont St-Louis, thus discovering the sport that really suited him.

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Beckie Scott

In a sport dominated by European athletes, Scott is a lone North American success story in international cross-country ski competition. Her success leading up to the 2002 Salt Lake Olympic Games was gradual.

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John Dickerson Parker

John Dickerson "Jackie" Parker, football player (b at Knoxville, Tennessee (US) 1 January 1932; d at Edmonton, Alta 7 Nov 2006). Nicknamed "Ol' Spaghetti Legs," Jackie Parker is considered to be the most successful player in the CANADIAN FOOTBALL LEAGUE's history.

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Don Forest

Don Forest, mountaineer (b 1920; d 2003). Don Forest did not begin serious mountaineering until his forties even though he had an interest in the outdoors throughout his life. Some of his earliest climbs were done with Gmoser and Grillmair in the early 1960s.

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Jasey-Jay Anderson

Jasey-Jay Anderson, snowboarder (born 13 April 1975 in Montreal, QC). Anderson has competed in every Olympic Winter Games since 1998, when snowboarding made its Olympic debut. At the 2018 Games in PyeongChang, South Korea, he became the first Canadian to compete in six Games. Anderson won the gold medal in parallel giant slalom at the 2010 Olympic Winter Games in Vancouver. Over his career he has also won four World Championship titles, as well as six World Cup titles, including four as overall World Cup champion (2001–04).

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Eugenie Bouchard

Eugenie Bouchard, tennis player (born 25 February 1994 in Montréal, QC). At Wimbledon 2014, Bouchard became the first Canadian singles player to reach the final of a senior Grand Slam singles tennis tournament. Although she lost to Petra Kvitova, the match was watched by over a million Canadians and helped make Bouchard a media sensation. Two years earlier, Bouchard had won the Wimbledon 2012 girls’ tournament, becoming the first Canadian to win a Grand Slam singles title at any level. A two-time winner of the Bobbie Rosenfeld Award (2013 and 2014), she was the Women’s Tennis Association (WTA) Newcomer of the Year in 2013 and won a WTA title in Nuremberg, Germany, in 2014.

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Larry Walker

Larry Kenneth Robert Walker, baseball player, coach (born 1 December 1966 in Maple Ridge, BC). Larry Walker is arguably the greatest Canadian position player in Major League Baseball (MLB) history. He and pitcher Ferguson Jenkins are the only Canadian players to be inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. A five-time all-star, Walker won seven Gold Gloves, three Silver Sluggers and the 1997 National League MVP award. He hit more than .300 in nine seasons, led the Major Leagues in batting average three times and was the first Canadian-born player to win a batting title since Tip O’Neill in 1887. Walker leads all Canadian MLB players in hits, home runs, RBI, doubles and runs scored. He won the Lou Marsh Trophy as Canada’s athlete of the year in 1998 and received the Tip O’Neill Award as Canada’s best baseball player nine times — more than any other player. He has also been inducted into the BC Sports Hall of Fame, the Colorado Sports Hall of Fame, Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame and the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame.

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Christie Blatchford

Christie Blatchford, journalist, newspaper columnist, writer, broadcaster (born 20 May 1951 in Rouyn-Noranda, QC; died 12 February 2020 in Toronto, ON). Christie Blatchford was one of Canada’s best-known journalists. In a career spanning five decades, she wrote for all of Canada’s national daily newspapers — the Globe and Mail, the Toronto Star and the National Post — as well as the Toronto Sun. She also published several books, including Fifteen Days: Stories of Bravery, Friendship, Life and Death from Inside the New Canadian Army (2008), which won the Governor General’s Literary Award for Non-Fiction. Blatchford won a National Newspaper Award for her columns in 1999 and was inducted into the Canadian News Hall of Fame in November 2019. She was a conservative writer who focused mainly on crime, human suffering and criminal justice. Her often controversial views prompted strong reactions and media responses.