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Article

Brian McKeever

Brian McKeever, cross-country skier (born 18 June 1979 in Calgary, AB). McKeever has won 17 medals in men’s cross-country skiing and biathlon at the Paralympic Winter Games between 2002 and 2018.

Article

Manon Rhéaume

Manon Rhéaume, hockey player (born 24 February 1972 in Lac-Beauport, Québec). Goaltender Manon Rhéaume was a pioneer in women’s hockey. In 1992, she became the first woman to try out for a National Hockey League (NHL) team and to play in an NHL game. In doing so, she also became the first woman to play in any of North America’s major sports leagues. Rhéaume also represented Canada in international women’s hockey. She was part of the World Championship women’s team in 1992 and 1994, and helped Team Canada win the Olympic silver medal in 1998, the first year that women’s hockey was included in the Olympic Winter Games.

Article

Carol Huynh

Carol Huynh, wrestler, Olympic medallist (born 16 November 1980 in Hazelton, BC). Carol Huynh, the daughter of Vietnamese refugees, is the first Canadian woman to win an Olympic gold medal in wrestling. Her victory was also the first gold medal for Canada at the Beijing Olympics in 2008. In 2012, Huynh won the bronze medal in her division at the London Olympics. A winner of 11 Canadian championships, she has also won gold at the Commonwealth and Pan-American Games, and has medalled at four world wrestling championships.

Article

Lionel Conacher

Lionel Pretoria Conacher, multi-sport athlete, politician (born 24 May 1900 in Toronto, Ontario; died 26 May 1954 in Ottawa, Ontario). Deserving of his nickname, “the big train,” Lionel Conacher was Canada’s greatest all-round athlete. He was named Canada’s Athlete of the Half Century in 1950. He also served as an MPP and as Ontario athletic commissioner, as well as a federal Member of Parliament. One of only three players to win both a Stanley Cup and a Grey Cup, Conacher was inducted into Canada’s Sports Hall of Fame (1955), the Canadian Football Hall of Fame (1963), the Canadian Lacrosse Hall of Fame (1966) the Hockey Hall of Fame (1994) and Canada’s Walk of Fame (2022). The award for Canada’s male athlete of the year is named in his honour.

Article

Gérard Côté

A few weeks later, he won his first race. It was held between the towns of Ste-Madeleine and St-Hyacinthe. In early 1932, he registered for his first snowshoe race.

Article

Bobby Hull

Hull won the Art Ross Trophy 3 times, the Hart Trophy twice and the Lady Byng Trophy once, scoring 610 goals and 1170 points in 15 NHL seasons. In 1972 he accepted $1 million to jump from the NHL to the Winnipeg Jets, giving immediate credibility to the fledgling World Hockey Association.

Article

Luc Robitaille

Robitaille was not originally thought to be all-star NHL material. He was the 171st pick of the 1984 NHL entry draft, selected in the 9th round by the Los Angeles Kings.

Article

Raymond Jean Bourque

Raymond Bourque, hockey player (b at Montréal, Qué, 28 Dec 1960). Raymond Bourque is one of the NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE's best-ever defensemen, holding the record for the most points, goals and assists for a defenseman in the league.

Article

Pierre Lueders

Pierre Lueders, bobsledder (born 26 September 1970 in Edmonton, AB). Lueders is one of Canada's most decorated bobsledders, with two Olympic medals and numerous top finishes at world events in both two- and four-man sleds.

Article

Émilie Mondor

​Émilie Mondor, athlete, middle-distance runner (born 29 April 1981 in Montréal, Québec; died 9 September 2006 in Ottawa, Ontario).

Article

Grant Fuhr

Grant Fuhr, hockey player (b at Spruce Grove, Alta 28 Sept 1962). Grant Fuhr was one of the National Hockey League's best-ever goalies and a member of the outstanding Edmonton Oilers lineup of the 1980s.

Article

Cassie Campbell-Pascall

Cassie Dawn Campbell-Pascall (née Campbell), CM, hockey player, broadcaster, administrator (born 22 November 1973 in Richmond Hill, ON). Three-time Olympian Cassie Campbell-Pascall won gold medals in women’s hockey at the 2002 Olympic Winter Games in Salt Lake City and the 2006 Olympic Winter Games in Turin. She is the only hockey player, man or woman, to captain Canada to two Olympic gold medals. She also won a silver medal with Team Canada at the 1998 Olympic Winter Games in Nagano. Campbell-Pascall won gold with Canada at six Women’s World Hockey Championships (1994, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2001 and 2004) and silver at the 2005 championships. She scored 100 points (32 goals and 68 assists) in 157 games for Team Canada. She has worked as a broadcaster for CBC’s Hockey Night in Canada since 2006. She has also served on the board of the Canadian Women Hockey’s League (CWHL) and on the selection committee for the Hockey Hall of Fame.

List

Notable Indigenous Olympians in Canada

Drawing inspiration from the Olympic Games in ancient Greece, the modern Olympics began in 1896. Like the Olympics, the Paralympic Games take place every two years, alternating between summer and winter sports. Indigenous athletes from Canada have competed at these games and brought home medals. They have represented the country in various sports at the Olympics, from long-distance running to skiing to water sports and more. This article explores some of the most notable Indigenous Olympians from Canada.

Article

Reggie Leach

Reginald Joseph Leach, hockey player (born 23 April 1950 in WinnipegMB). Known as the “Riverton Rifle,” Ojibwe winger Reggie Leach is considered one of the premier goal scorers of the 1970s and one of the best Indigenous players in National Hockey League (NHL) history. As a member of the Philadelphia Flyers, Leach won the Stanley Cup in 1975. In 1976, he won the league goal-scoring title with 61 goals, adding another 19 in the post-season en route to winning the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP. Leach is the only non-goaltender to earn that distinction as a member of the Stanley Cup-losing team. Leach played 934 regular season NHL games, scoring 381 goals and 285 assists. He shares all-time league records for most goals scored in a single playoff game (5) and most goals scored in a single post-season (19). He is a member of the Manitoba Hockey Hall of Fame, the Manitoba Sports Hall of Fame, the Philadelphia Flyers Hall of Fame and the Order of Manitoba.

Macleans

Jean Boyle (Profile)

Jean Boyle is used to being the best. An athlete as a youth in Ottawa's largely francophone east end, he won a black belt in judo by the age of 20. As an officer cadet at the Royal Military College in Kingston, Ont.

Article

Robert Rousseau

Robert Rousseau, hockey player, professional golfer (b at Montréal 26 Jul 1940). When the Rousseau family settled in Saint-Hyacinthe (Québec) in 1942, Robert was two years old. Throughout his childhood he was especially fond of ice HOCKEY, his older brothers serving as role models.

Article

Mike Gartner

Michael "Mike" Alfred Gartner, hockey player (b at Ottawa, Ont 29 Oct 1959). One of the NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUE's fastest skaters, Mike Gartner is known for his consistent ability to score and his dedication to Canada's national teams in international competition.

Article

Joey Votto

Joey Votto, baseball player (born 10 September 1983 in Toronto, ON). Joey Votto is a Canadian baseball player with the Cincinnati Reds. In 2010, he won the National League’s Most Valuable Player Award and Hank Aaron Award, as well as the Lou Marsh Trophy for Canada’s outstanding athlete of the year. Two years later, he became one of the highest paid baseball players in major league history. In 2017, he was again awarded the Lou Marsh Trophy. He has also won the James “Tip” O’Neill Award seven times.

Macleans

Lorie Kane (Profile)

This article was originally published in Maclean’s magazine on August 3, 1998. Partner content is not updated.

It's Friday night at the Javelina Cantina, a Tex-Mex saloon in Tucson, Ariz., and the standing-room-only crowd is ringing in the weekend with pitchers of beer and all-you-can-eat fajitas. Fresh off the golf course, Nancy Lopez and Lorie Kane fit right in.