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Grand Theatre

Grand Theatre The original Grand Opera House opened amid a strong amateur and professional theatrical tradition on 8 Sept 1881 in the upper floors of the Masonic Temple at London, Ont. At its peak in the 1890s, the 2070-seat Grand was host to 100 companies and 300 performances annually.

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St Lawrence Hall

In 1967, as a Toronto centennial project, the building was restored, and the auditorium came into use again for social functions and chamber music concerts.The building also houses the administrative offices and rehearsal rooms of the National Ballet of Canada.

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Fort Amherst

Fort Amherst, on the west shore of Charlottetown Harbour, PEI, was built in late 1758 by the British. The site had been known previously as Port La Joie, established in 1720 as the capital of the French colony of Île Saint-Jean.

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Eaton Centre

The Eaton Centre, Toronto (designed by the Zeidler Partnership and Bregman and Hamann, phase 1 opening in 1977, phase 2 in 1979) is the epitome of those vast multistorey interior "atrium" spaces for which Canadian architecture became known internationally in the 1970s. The centre comprises The T.

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Condominium

Owners in a condominium project are responsible for all expenses relating to their own individual unit, but in addition the condominium owners must pay their share of the expenses relating to the common areas.

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The Grange

Grange, The Throughout its history this elegant brick building, constructed about 1817 on a 40 ha property stretching from Queen to Bloor streets, has been linked to the social, intellectual and political life of Toronto. Built

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Montmorency

The Montmorency Manoir, built in 1781 by Frederick HALDIMAND, governor general in chief of Canada, was inhabited 1791-94 by the duke of Kent, father of Queen Victoria. First known as the "Kent House," it suffered a devastating fire in 1993 but was rebuilt by the following year.

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Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec

The Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec in Quebec City houses the world’s most extensive collection of Québécois art, ranging from the paintings of such 19th-century masters as James Wilson Morrice and Cornelius Krieghoff to contemporary artists such as the Quebec City-based collective BGL. It also holds collections of early, modern and contemporary Canadian art, including an extensive collection of Inuit art. Since it opened in 1933, the Musée has designed, organized and hosted hundreds of exhibitions. Expanded in 1991 and again in 2016, the four-pavilion complex includes numerous exhibition galleries and workshops, an auditorium and a sculpture garden. The Musée also plays a role in the community through its library, educational service, and photographic documentation centre.

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Parliament Buildings

Canada’s Parliament Buildings are home to the federal government in Ottawa. Designed in a gothic revival style, the buildings officially opened on 6 June 1866, about a year before Confederation.

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Fortification

Although the barrier posed by these walls was sometimes increased by setting a ditch below their outer faces, fortification did not progress beyond this rather simple conception until the 16th century.