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Displaying 701-720 of 950 results
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Three Hills

Three Hills, Alta, incorporated as a town in 1929, population 3198 (2011c), 3089 (2006c). The Town of Three Hills is located 128 km northeast of Calgary. Three Hills takes its name from 3 prominent hills to the north of the town.

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Wainwright

Wainwright, Alta, incorporated as a town in 1910, population 5925 (2011c), 5426 (2006c). The Town of Wainwright is located 200 km southeast of Edmonton. The first settlement, Denwood, established in 1906, was moved in its entirety to a railway divisional point 4 km away in 1908.

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Wembley

Wembley, Alta, incorporated as a village in 1928 and as a town in 1980, population 1383 (2011c), 1443 (2006c). The Town of Wembley is 23 km west of GRANDE PRAIRIE on Highway 43.

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Keno Hill

Keno Hill (or Keno City), YT, Settlement, pop 15 (2006c), 20 (2001c). Keno Hill is located 122 km northwest of the Klondike Highway, 466 km by road north from Whitehorse. In 1919 Louis Beauvette staked the Roulette silver-lead claim on top of Keno Hill in the MAYO district.

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Pouce Coupe

Pouce Coupe, British Columbia, incorporated as a village in 1932, population 792 (2016 census), 738 (2011 census). The village of Pouce Coupe is located 6 km southeast of Dawson Creek on the highway and freight railway between there and Grande Prairie, Alberta. Its name likely comes from that of a Dane-zaa chief, Pooscapee, which early voyageurs rendered into the French name Pouce Coupé (Cut Thumb).

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Elsa

In 1946 Keno Mining Co Ltd (later United Keno Hills Mines Ltd) reopened the mine. The community received a post office in 1949 and the 1950s was the starting point for the first oil exploration winter road to drilling sites 500 km to the north.

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Spiritwood

The town is a service and administrative centre for the surrounding area. Grain growing and the raising of livestock are the main activities. The town lies in close proximity to a number of lakes and parks, with many recreational opportunities including fishing, snowmobiling, hunting and golfing.

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Barkerville

Barkerville is a preserved and dynamic gold-rush town in the British Columbia interior. Each summer, its rich history during the Cariboo Gold Rush and subsequent gold mining in the area is demonstrated for visitors from all over the world.

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Gibsons

Gibsons, BC, incorporated as a town in 1982, population 4437 (2011c), 4182 (2006c). The Town of Gibsons is located just north of VANCOUVER at the western entrance to Howe Sound. The town is reached from Vancouver by car ferry from Horseshoe Bay.

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Erickson

Swedish and Norwegian immigrants were among the first settlers in the region. They took up homesteads in the Otter Lake and Rolling River area on a reserve called Scandinavia or New Sweden, established in 1885 as part of a campaign to attract Scandinavian immigrants to Canada.

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Castlegar

Castlegar, BC, incorporated as a city in 1974, population 7816 (2011c), 7259 (2006c). The City of Castlegar is located on the west bank of the COLUMBIA RIVER at its junction with the Kootenay River, midway between Calgary and Vancouver, and about 35 km north of the US border.

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Farnham

During the first 40 years (1810-50), the chief source of revenue was the manufacture of potash. The construction of the Stanstead-Shefford & Chambly Railway in 1857 began Farnham's remarkable progress as a railway centre, thanks to its geographic position and competition among railway promoters.

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Whitecourt

Whitecourt, Alta, incorporated as a town in 1971, population 9605 (2011c), 8971 (2006c). The Town of Whitecourt is located near the confluence of the McLeod and ATHABASCA rivers, 177 km northwest of Edmonton.

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Uummannarjuaq (Blacklead Island)

 Uummannarjuaq, which means "like a big sea mammal's heart," had long been an Inuit seasonal campsite. The island attracted whalers because of its strategic location close to the floe edge--the boundary between shore ice and open water where the spring whale hunt took place.

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Reserves

In 2016, 744,855 people identified as First Nations with Indian Status, 44.2 per cent of which lived on reserves. Reserves are governed by the Indian Act, and residence on a reserve is governed by band councils as well as the federal government. Under the Indian Act, reserves that serve as residences are referred to as Indian Bands. Many reserves or bands are now referred to as First Nations. Reserves may serve as spiritual and physical homelands for their people, but they are also tangible representations of colonial governance. As such they are often the focal point of activism relating to land claims, resource management, cultural appropriation, socio-economic conditions, self-governance and cultural self-determination.

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St. Jacobs

St. Jacobs, ON, established as a Police Village in 1904 and dissolved as such in 1972 under the Regional Municipality of Waterloo Act (1972), population 1,891 (2011c), 1,597 (2006c).

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Manning

Manning, Alta, incorporated as a village in 1951 and as a town in 1957, population 1164 (2011c), 1493 (2006c). The Town of Manning lies beside the Notikewin River, 73 km north of the town of PEACE RIVER.

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St Marys

The CANADA COMPANY had the area surveyed in 1839. The first settlers were attracted to the community in the 1840s because its location on the banks of the 2 watercourses meant water power to run various mills.

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Penetanguishene

The earliest European visitors were Étienne BRÛLÉ and Samuel de CHAMPLAIN, developing links between New France and the HURON.