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Nova Scotia and Confederation

Nova Scotia was one of the four founding provinces of Canada. It joined New Brunswick,  Ontario and Quebec in Confederation on 1 July 1867. However, this was mainly because Confederation delivered the Intercolonial Railway to the Maritimes, and because of the efforts of Sir Charles Tupper. His government passed approval for Confederation in the colonial legislature despite popular opposition. (See Confederation’s Opponents.) Confederation was met with mass protests in the colony. Joseph Howe led a two-year effort to repeal the union. (See Repeal Movement.) But Howe finally decided he could do more to help his province by working inside the federal government. He joined the federal Cabinet in 1869.

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Surrey

Surrey, British Columbia, incorporated as a city in 1993, population 517,887 (2016 census), 468, 251 (2011 census). The city of Surrey is the second-largest municipality by population in British Columbia, after Vancouver. Part of Metro Vancouver, it is bounded by the Fraser River on the north and Washington state on the south. The municipalities of Langley and Delta lie to the east and west.

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Whitby

Whitby, Ontario, incorporated as a town in 1855, population 128,377 (2016 census), 122,022 (2011 census). The town of Whitby is located on Lake Ontario, 56 km east of Toronto.

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Calgary

Calgary, Alberta, incorporated as a city in 1894, population 1,239,220 (2016 census) 1,096,833 (2011 census). The city of Calgary is situated on the Bow River in southern Alberta, about 220 km north of the American border at the meeting point of the Western prairies and mountain foothills. It is the financial centre of western Canada, based on its key role in the development of the region’s oil and gas industry. With its panoramic backdrop of the Rocky Mountains and its historic association with cattle ranching and oil exploration, Calgary is one of Canada’s most identifiable cities.

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New Brunswick and Confederation

New Brunswick became one of the founding members of the Dominion of Canada on 1 July 1867 when it joined Nova Scotia, Ontario and Quebec in Confederation. Arthur Hamilton Gordon, the lieutenant-governor of New Brunswick, helped organize the Charlottetown Conference (1–9 September 1864), where a federal union of British North American colonies was first discussed. By 1865, however, a majority in the New Brunswick legislature had swung against it. Albert Smith defeated pro-Confederation premier Samuel Tilley in a snap election that year. But the Fenian Raids in 1866 fueled New Brunswick’s sense of insecurity and increased support for Confederation. After Tilley’s party won another election in 1866, the legislature voted 38–1 in favour of Confederation.

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New Denver

New Denver, British Columbia, incorporated as a village in 1929, population 473 (2016 census), 504 (2011 census). The village of New Denver is located near the northeastern end of Slocan Lake, 100 km north of Nelson. The site was first called Eldorado, then New Denver (1892), after Denver, Colorado.

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Moosomin

Moosomin, Saskatchewan, incorporated as a town in 1887, population 2,743 (2016 census), 2,485 (2011 census). The town of Moosomin is located in southeastern Saskatchewan 15 km west of the Manitoba border.

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Gwaii Haanas

At 1,470 km2, Gwaii Haanas National Park Reserve, National Marine Conservation Area Reserve, and Haida Heritage Site (also known as Gwaii Haanas) encompasses 15 per cent of Haida Gwaii.

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City

In Canada "city" is a broad, generic term usually referring to an urbanized area.

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Kindersley

Kindersley, Sask, incorporated as a town in 1911, population 4678 (2011c), 4412 (2006c). The Town of Kindersley is located in west-central Saskatchewan, 200 km southwest of Saskatoon and 65 km east of the Alberta border. 

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Kugluktuk

Kugluktuk, Nunavut, incorporated as a hamlet in 1981, population 1,491 (2016 census), population 1,450 (2011 census). The Hamlet of Kugluktuk, formerly known as Coppermine, is situated west of the mouth of the Coppermine River on the mainland Arctic coast. The hamlet changed its name in 1996 to Kugluktuk, which means "place of rapids," referring to the rapids at Bloody Falls, 15 km upstream.

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Milton

Milton,Ontario, incorporated as a town in 1857, population 110,128 (2016 census), 84,362 (2011 census). The Town of Milton is located 29 km west of Toronto. The area was opened to settlement with the purchase of the Mississauga Tract from the Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation (see Ojibwe) and creation of the York Road (Hwy 5) to London.

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Caraquet

Caraquet, New Brunswick, incorporated as a town in 1961, population 4,248 (2016 census), 4,169 (2011 census). The town of Caraquet is located 68 km northeast of Bathurst. Its houses line the Baie de Caraquet, a rocky section of Chaleur Bay’s southern coast, offering magnificent views of the sea and the Gaspé Peninsula.

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Wallaceburg

Wallaceburg, Ontario, population centre, population 10,098 (2016 census), 10,127 (2011 census). Wallaceburg is a community located on the Sydenham River. Formerly a town (incorporated 1896), in 1998 Wallaceburg became a part of the new municipality of Chatham-Kent.

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Peterborough

Founded in 1825, Peterborough was named the following year for Peterborough, New Hampshire, and intended as a compliment for Peter ROBINSON, who directed the settlement of a large number of Irish immigrants in the area.

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La Tuque

La Tuque, Quebec, incorporated 1911, population 11,001 (2016 census), 11,227 (2011 census). La Tuque is located on the Rivière Saint-Maurice, 165 km north of Trois-Rivières. The town was built at the start of the 20th century at the site of a former trading post. It owes its name to a mountain shaped like a triangular woolen hat, popularly known as a “tuque.” The town’s economy is driven in large part by the forestry industry.