Search for "New France"

Displaying 241-260 of 322 results
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Little Burgundy and Montreal's Black English-Speaking Community

Little Burgundy is a neighbourhood in the southwest borough of Montreal, Quebec. It is the historical home of the city’s Black English-speaking, working-class community (see also Black Canadians). Montreal's early Black settlement was comprised mainly of African Americans who lived in the Faubourg (French for "suburb") of St. Antoine — a neighbourhood that is now known as Little Burgundy. The settlement dates to the emergence of the railway companies in the mid- to late 19th century and the era of the Black sleeping car porters.

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Halifax

Halifax, Nova Scotia, incorporated as a city in 1841, population 403,131 (2016 c), 390,096 (2011 c). Halifax is the capital of Nova Scotia and the largest urban area in Atlantic Canada. On 1 April 1996 Halifax was amalgamated with neighbouring communities to form the Halifax Regional Municipal Government. Halifax Regional Municipality occupies a strategic and central location on the province's east coast and is one of the world's largest harbours. Sometimes called "Warden of the North" for its historic military role, today it is a major regional centre for Atlantic Canada's economy.

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Walkerton

Walkerton was settled in the mid-1850s and quickly developed as an important mill site and service centre for the surrounding area. In the 1860s it became the seat of the county's government.

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Bridgewater

Bridgewater, NS, incorporated as a town in1899, population 8241 (2011c), 7944 (2006c). The Town of Bridgewater is located at the head of navigation on the LaHave River, 16 km from its mouth.

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Pointe-au-Père

In 1663, the Jesuit priest Henri Nouvel landed on the south bank of the St Lawrence River and conducted the first mass. In 1696 this territory was the seigneurie de Lessard, granted to Pierre Lessard and Barbe Fortin, his wife.

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Stephenville

Stephenville, NL, incorporated as a town in 1952, population 6719 (2011c), 6588 (2006c). The Town of Stephenville is located on the north shore of St George's Bay in southwestern Newfoundland.

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Chesterfield Inlet, Nunavut

Chesterfield Inlet, Nunavut, incorporated as a hamlet in 1980, population 313 (2011c), 332 (2006c). The Hamlet of Chesterfield Inlet is located in a bay on the south shore of CHESTERFIELD INLET on the west side of Hudson Bay, 101 km northeast of RANKIN INLET.

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Trinity

Trinity, NL, incorporated as a town in 1997, population 137 (2011c), 191 (2006c). The Town of Trinity is located on TRINITY BAY in northeast Newfoundland.

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Grand Falls (NB)

Grand Falls (or Grand-Sault), NB, incorporated as a town in 1890, population 5706 (2011c), 5650 (2006c). The Town of Grand Falls is located 228 km up the SAINT JOHN RIVER from Fredericton at the point where the Canada-US boundary begins to be designated by the river.

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Newmarket

Newmarket, Ont, incorporated as a town in 1880, population 79 978 (2011c), 74 295 (2006c). The Town of Newmarket is located on the Holland River with easy access to the Don and Humber rivers, 25 km north of Toronto.

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Fleurimont

Fleurimont, Qué, city, pop 16 521 (2001c), 16 262 (1996c), 14 727 (1991c), area 35.47 km2, inc 1993, is situated in the Eastern Townships region, about 150 km east of Montréal.

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Lacombe

Lacombe, Alta, incorporated as a town in 1902 and as a city in 2010, population 11 707 (2011c), 10 752 (2006c). The City of Lacombe, the county seat for the County of Lacombe, is situated in rolling parkland some 118 km south of Edmonton.

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Whitecourt

Whitecourt, Alta, incorporated as a town in 1971, population 9605 (2011c), 8971 (2006c). The Town of Whitecourt is located near the confluence of the McLeod and ATHABASCA rivers, 177 km northwest of Edmonton.

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Dartmouth

Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, metropolitan area, population (including Cole Harbour) 92,301 (2016 census), 91,212 (2011 census). Dartmouth is located on the eastern side of Halifax Harbour in the Halifax Regional Municipality (incorporated in 1996).

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Vegreville

Vegreville, Alberta, incorporated as a town in 1906, population 5,708 (2016 census), 5,717 (2011 census). The town of Vegreville is located in the parkland region of east-central Alberta, 100 km east of Edmonton. It serves a rich agricultural region specializing in grains and some livestock.

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Guelph

Guelph, Ontario, incorporated as a city in 1879, population 131,794 (2016 c), 121,688 (2011 c). The City of Guelph, the seat of Wellington County, is located on the Speed River in south central Ontario, 96 km west of Toronto and 28 km east of Kitchener-Waterloo. This industrial and educational centre is set in the heart of a highly productive agricultural region.

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Hull

 Hull, Qué, city, pop 66 246 (2001c), 62 339 (1996c), 60 707 (1991c), area 36.49 km2,inc 1875, is located on the north shore of the OTTAWA RIVER, west of the Rivière Gatineau, across from OTTAWA.

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British Columbia and Confederation

The colony of British Columbia was founded in 1858 in response to the Fraser River Gold Rush. (See also The Fraser River Gold Rush and the Founding of British Columbia.) The colony established representative government in 1864 and merged with the colony of Vancouver Island in 1866. In May 1868, Amor De Cosmos formed the Confederation League to bring responsible government to BC and to join Confederation. In September 1868, the Confederation League passed 37 resolutions outlining the terms for a union with the Dominion of Canada. The terms were passed by both the BC assembly and the federal Parliament in 1871. The colony joined Canada as the country’s sixth province on 20 July 1871. The threat of American annexation, embodied by the Alaska purchase of 1867, and the promise of a railway linking BC to the rest of Canada, were decisive factors.

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Newfoundland and Labrador and Confederation

Attempts to bring Newfoundland into Confederation in the 1860s and 1890s were met with lukewarm interest in the colony. In 1934, Newfoundland was in bankruptcy during the Great Depression. It suspended responsible government and accepted an unelected Commission Government directed by Britain. In a 1948 referendum, Newfoundlanders were given the choice to either continue with the Commission Government, join Canada, or seek a return to responsible government as an independent dominion. The independence option won the first vote. But the Confederation option won a run-off vote with 52.3 per cent support. The British and Canadian parliaments approved of the union. Newfoundland became Canada’s 10th province on 31 March 1949. In 2001, the province’s name was officially changed to Newfoundland and Labrador.

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