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Lac-Mégantic (town)

Lac-Mégantic, Quebec was incorporated as a town in 1907, population 5,747 (2021 census), 5,654 (2016 census). Located in Estrie in the Regional County Municipality of Le Granit, the town of Lac-Mégantic is situated approximately 95 km east of Sherbrooke on the northeast shore of Lac Mégantic (see Eastern Townships). The town is Le Granit’s centre of industry (lumber and granite), administration and commerce. On 6 July 2013, a devastating train derailment occurred in Lac-Mégantic (see Lac-Mégantic Rail DisasterRailway Disasters).

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Fort McPherson

Fort McPherson, Northwest Territories, population 741 (2020). The hamlet of Fort McPherson is located on the right bank of the Peel River, on the Dempster Highway. It is west of the Mackenzie River and east of the Richardson Mountains. Fort McPherson is called Teetł’it Zheh (“head of the waters-town”) in Gwich’in, an Athapaskan language (see Indigenous Languages in Canada). The hamlet is home to the Teetł’it Gwich’in First Nation (“people of the headwaters”). Fort McPherson is one of four communities in the Gwich’in Settlement Region. The region is an area created by the Gwich’in Comprehensive Land Claim Agreement (1992). The other three communities in the region are Aklavik, Tsiigehtchic and Inuvik.

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Saint John

Saint John, NB, incorporated as a city in 1785, population 67,575 (2016 census), 70,063 (2011 census). The City of Saint John, the second largest city in New Brunswick, is located at the mouth of the Saint John River on the Bay of Fundy.

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Fort Liard

Fort Liard, NWT, incorporated as a hamlet in 1987, population 536 (2011c), 583 (2006c). The Hamlet of Fort Liard is located on the south bank of the Liard River, 544 km by air southwest of Yellowknife and about 25 km north of the BC border.

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Saskatoon

The 2 Gowen sites show that hunting tribes were here 6000 years ago. Stratified settlement sites at Tipperary Creek (now Wanuskewin) indicate regular winter habitation by Indigenous peoples.

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Esterhazy

Esterhazy, Sask, incorporated as a village in 1903 and as a town in 1957, population 2472 (2011c), 2336 (2006c). The Town of Esterhazy is located in east-central Saskatchewan, 83 km southeast of YORKTON. It is named after Count

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Tofino

Tofino, British Columbia, incorporated as a municipality in 1932 and as a district in 1982, population 1,932 (2016 census), 1,876 (2011 census). The community of Tofino is located on the west coast of Vancouver Island, 317 km northwest of Victoria by road, on the northern tip of the Esowista Peninsula and the south side of Clayoquot Sound. The district encompasses an area of 19.09 km2 within the Clayoquot Sound Biosphere Reserve. Tofino developed around fishing and logging industries and is now a popular tourist destination, sought for its natural beauty and outdoor recreation.

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Westlock

Westlock, Alta, incorporated as a town in 1916, population 4823 (2011c), 5008 (2006c). The Town of Westlock is located 80 km northwest of Edmonton.

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Tignish

Today, Tignish is 93% Roman Catholic and more than 20% of the population can speak both French and English. The co-operative movement has been one of the community's most distinctive features.

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Alberton

By 1833 Alberton was known as "Stump Town" because hundreds of stumps were left after the clearing of a forest. Owing to its crossroads location, Alberton was later known as the "Cross." On 27 June 1862, the community was renamed in honour of Albert Edward, the Prince of Wales.

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Sainte-Agathe-des-Monts

In the 19th century, Sainte-Agathe had only a few sawmills, but the construction of the Montreal and Occidental Railway in 1892 (replaced by the CPR in 1900) encouraged tourism and the development of the hotels that have become the region's economic mainstay.

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Thunder Bay

Thunder Bay, ON, incorporated as a city in 1970, population 107,909 (2016 census), 108,359 (2011 census). The City of Thunder Bay was created by the amalgamation of the cities of Fort William and Port Arthur and the townships of Neebing and McIntyre. It is located in northwestern Ontario on the west shore of the Lake Superior bay of the same name. Thunder Bay is situated on the traditional territory of the Anishinaabeg, and the land is covered by the Robinson-Superior Treaty. The Port of Thunder Bay is a western stop along the Great Lakes-St Lawrence Seaway. The region’s geography is dominated by the rocks, lakes and forests of the Canadian Shield. Surrounding communities depend on tourism or resource extraction, and look to Thunder Bay for a wide variety of services.

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Grand-Mère

The first French missionary contact with the indigenous people, the MONTAGNAIS, took place in 1651, but the region remained virtually unsettled for nearly 200 years.

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Rosemère

In 1880, Rosemère was primarily an agricultural community. The beauty of the Laurentides region was later discovered and Rosemère established itself as a holiday destination.

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Grandview

Grandview, Manitoba, incorporated as a village in 1906 and as a town in 1909, population 859 (2011c), 839 (2006c). The Town of Grandview nestles between Riding and Duck mountains on the Valley River, 360 km northwest of Winnipeg.

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Winnipeg

Winnipeg, Manitoba, incorporated as a city in 1873, population 705,244 (2016 c), 663,617 (2011 c). The city of Winnipeg is the capital and largest city of Manitoba, and is located at the confluence of the Red River and Assiniboine River 100 km north of the Minnesota border. The name is derived from the Cree name for Lake Winnipeg, 65 km north, win-nipi, meaning "murky water." Winnipeg is an important economic and cultural centre for the Prairies. Lying midway between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, it has been called "Bull's Eye of the Dominion," and because of its location between the Canadian Shield and the prairie, "Gateway to the West."

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Quebec Act, 1774

The Quebec Act received royal assent on 22 June 1774. It revoked the Royal Proclamation of 1763, which had aimed to assimilate the French-Canadian population under English rule. The Quebec Act was put into effect on 1 May 1775. It was passed to gain the loyalty of the French-speaking majority of the Province of Quebec. Based on recommendations from Governors James Murray and Guy Carleton, the Act guaranteed the freedom of worship and restored French property rights. However, the Act had dire consequences for Britain’s North American empire. Considered one of the five “Intolerable Acts” by the Thirteen American Colonies, the Quebec Act was one of the direct causes of the American Revolutionary War (1775–83). It was followed by the Constitutional Act in 1791.

This is the full-length entry about the Quebec Act of 1774. For a plain language summary, please see The Quebec Act, 1774 (Plain-Language Summary).

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Logan Lake

Logan Lake, BC, incorporated as a district municipality in 1970, population 2073 (2011c), 2162 (2006c). The District of Logan Lake is in the heart of the Highland Valley, 17 km west of the COQUIHALLA HIGHWAY between Kamloops and Merritt.