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Royal Alexandra Theatre

The 'Royal Alex,' as it is known affectionately, was designed by John Lyle who, using New York's New Amsterdam Theater as a model, incorporated novel features such as air conditioning which required tons of ice and.9 m-thick concrete floors which made it Canada's first fireproof theatre.

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Toronto College of Music

Toronto College of Music. One of three music schools to open in Toronto during the 1880s - the others being the TCM(RCMT) and the Metropolitan School of Music. The college was founded in 1888 by F.H. Torrington and by 1890 had 400 students and a faculty of about 50.

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Maniwaki

The Oblate Fathers founded the mission Notre-Dame du Désert in 1849. Soon after, many settlers moved into the area, drawn by the forest's economic potential. A forest industry was established and provided the livelihood for the residents of the region. In 1851, Maniwaki was declared a parish.

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Gravelbourg

In 1918 a convent was built in the town as well as a college, which was affiliated with UNIVERSITY OF OTTAWA; other Catholic buildings followed: a Romanesque cathedral (1919), a monastery (1926) and a hospital.

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Fort Qu'Appelle

The Cree and Saulteaux signed Treaty 4 at this site in 1874, and a year later a North-West Mounted Police outpost was established near the present townsite.

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Music in Saskatoon

Saskatchewan city founded in 1882 as a temperance colony by pioneers from Ontario. It was incorporated as a town, with a population of 544, in 1903, and as a city, with five times that number, in 1906.

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Skinners Pond

Beginning in the 1940s, the fishermen have supplemented their incomes by raking IRISH MOSS from the harbour beaches, from which a gelatinous substance called carrageenin is extracted for use in pharmaceutical and certain food products.

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Music in New Westminster

City east of Vancouver near the mouth of the Fraser River. After its designation (1859, incorporation 1860) as the capital city of British Columbia it was named New Westminster by Queen Victoria, and hence nicknamed 'The Royal City.

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Centre in the Square

Centre in the Square. Arts centre in Kitchener, Ont, opened in September 1980, incorporating a concert hall and an adjacent art gallery. The architects were Rieder, Hymmen and Lobban of Kitchener, and the general contractors were Ball Brothers Ltd.

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Library of Parliament

The Library of Parliament came into being when the legislative libraries of Upper and Lower Canada were amalgamated in 1841 and situated in Montréal. In 1849 only 200 of the 12,000 books were saved when an angry mob protesting the Rebellion Losses Bill set fire to the Parliament Buildings.

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Music in Saint-Hyacinthe

A city in Quebec on the Yamaska River, some 50 km east of Montreal. Founded in 1748, a municipality in 1849, and a town in 1857, it was named after the patron saint of Jacques-Hyacinthe-Simon Delorme, the local seigneur.

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Vanscoy

Vanscoy, Sask, incorporated as a rural municipality in 1909, population 2714 (2011c), 2629 (2006c). The Rural Municipality of Vanscoy is located about 30 km southwest of SASKATOON. The original name for this rural municipality was Logantown.

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Nipawin

Nipawin is situated at a point on the Saskatchewan River where the prairie and woodland meet. It also lies between 2 lakes (Tobin, 1963 and Codette, 1986) that are the result of hydroelectricity development on the river.

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Destruction Bay

Destruction Bay, Yukon, Settlement, population 35 (2011c), 55 (2006c). Destruction Bay is located on the west side of Kluane Lake between HAINES JUNCTION and BURWASH LANDING at Mile 1083 on the Alaska Highway.

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Camp X

Camp X — a popular name that reflects the secrecy surrounding its activities — was a training school for covert agents and a radio communications centre that operated close to Whitby, Ontario, during the Second World War. It was the first such purpose-built facility constructed in North America. Known officially as STS (Special Training School) 103, Camp X was one of several dozen around the world that served the needs of the Special Operations Executive (SOE), the British agency created in 1940 to “set Europe ablaze” by promoting sabotage and subversion behind enemy lines. The radio communications centre, with its high-speed transmitter known as Hydra, was closely linked with British Security Co-Ordination (BSC), the New York-based agency directed by the Winnipeg-born businessman William Stephenson. Soviet defector Igor Gouzenko was hidden there after his defection in September 1945.