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Grand River

From its source just south of Georgian Bay, the Grand River winds 266 km to Lake Erie, dropping 352 m along the way. Together with its major tributaries, the Speed, Nith, Conestogo and Eramosa rivers, it drains 6200 km2, the largest watershed in southern Ontario.

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Aylmer (Ont)

Aylmer, Ont, incorporated as a town in 1887, population 7151 (2011c), 7069 (2006c). The Town of Aylmer is located 50 km south of London and 15 km north of Lake Erie, on Catfish Creek.

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Tuktoyaktuk

Tuktoyaktuk, NWT, incorporated as a hamlet in 1970, population 898 (2016 census), 854 (2011 census). The Hamlet of Tuktoyaktuk is located on the coast of the Beaufort Sea, east of the Mackenzie River delta, and 1,135 km northwest of Yellowknife by air. Tuktoyaktuk, commonly referred to as Tuk, is a transportation and government centre, as well as a base for oil and natural gas exploration.

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Music at Sharon

Music at Sharon. Annual summer concert series at the Temple of the Children of Peace at Sharon, near Newmarket, Ontario, presented 1981-90 under the auspices of the York Pioneer and Historical Society.

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Humber River (Ontario)

Encompassing 908 km2 in total, the Humber River watershed is the largest in the Toronto region. The 126-kilometre long Humber River has its headwaters in the ancient rock of the NIAGARA ESCARPMENT and the glacial hills of the Oak Ridges Moraine.

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Lincoln

Lincoln, Ont, incorporated as a town in 1970, population 22 487 (2011c), 21 722 (2006c). The Town of Lincoln is situated in the Niagara Peninsula, immediately west of ST CATHARINES.

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Badlands

Badlands are dramatic landforms characterized by a network of deep, narrow and winding gullies, along with occasional hoodoo rocks. Their steep, barren slopes provide striking evidence of the force of erosion by wind and water — a source of continual change in their terrain.

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Rideau Hall

A sophisticated estate that incorporated the primary elements of English landscape style, Rideau Hall was thought to be in keeping with the stature and lifestyle of the Queen's representative in Canada.

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Waskahegan Trail

Waskahegan Trail is a regional hiking trail of more than 300 km developed in and around EDMONTON, Alta. It began as a Canadian Centennial project (1967) to promote hiking opportunities in Alberta's capital region. Similar in

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Music in Montréal

Montreal, Quebec is a city located on the island of the same name at the junction of the St Lawrence and Ottawa rivers in the province of Québec. The island is one of a cluster that also includes Ile Jésus (which became part of the city of Laval in 1965) and the islands of Bizard and Perrot.

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Music at University of Windsor

University of Windsor. Founded in 1857 at Windsor, Ont, as Assumption College (Roman Catholic). It became a university in 1953 and was granted incorporation as the non-denominational University of Windsor in 1963, affiliating at the same time with Essex College.

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North Saskatchewan River

​The North Saskatchewan River (1,287 km long, the first 48.5 km of which is designated as a Canadian Heritage River) is a major tributary to the Saskatchewan River, which ultimately flows into Hudson Bay. The mean annual flow is 241 m3/s; however, flow varies between the peak in July and minimum in February. It served as a major transportation route from the end of the last Ice Age through the mid-20th century.

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South Saskatchewan River

​The South Saskatchewan River (1,392 km long) is a heavily utilized water source in southern Alberta and Saskatchewan and is a major tributary to the Saskatchewan River, ultimately discharging to Hudson Bay. Mean flow is 280 m3/s, but varies throughout the year, largely controlled by several dams and reservoirs along the river system. The South Saskatchewan River flows through an agriculturally productive region and is prone to periodic droughts and floods.

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Stanley Park

​Stanley Park (established 1887, 4 km2) is Vancouver’s first city park and one of the largest urban parks in Canada. It encompasses the peninsula west of downtown Vancouver and is surrounded by the waters of Burrard Inlet, Coal Harbour and English Bay. Stanley Park is located on the traditional territory of Coast Salish First Nations, including the Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil Waututh. In 1886, the council for the City of Vancouver sent a request to the Canadian government for permission to use the military reserve to the west of the city as a public park. The Canadian government granted the city permission to create such a park in 1887. Stanley Park later opened to the public on 27 September 1888. The park is named for Governor General Frederick Arthur Stanley.