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Displaying 1981-2000 of 2196 results
Article

Grimshaw

Grimshaw, Alta, incorporated as a town in 1953, population 2515 (2011c), 2537 (2006c). The Town of Grimshaw is located in the Peace River area 26 km west of the town of PEACE RIVER.

Article

Hanna

Hanna, Alta, incorporated as a town in 1914, population 2673 (2011c), 2847 (2006c). The Town of Hanna is situated 219 km northeast of Calgary and was named after David B. HANNA, 3rd vice-president of the Canadian Northern Railway, and was first settled in 1912.

Article

High Level

High Level, Alta, incorporated as a town in 1983, population 3641 (2011c), 3887 (2006c). The Town of High Level is located 250 km north of the town of PEACE RIVER and was named for a high expanse of land separating the Hay and PEACE river systems.

Article

High Prairie

High Prairie, Alta, incorporated as a village in 1945 and as a town in 1950, population 2600 (2011c), 2785 (2006c). Located on the south edge of the Peace River region, the Town of High Prairie is 365 km northwest of Edmonton and 200 km northeast of Grande Prairie.

Article

White Rock

White Rock, BC, incorporated as a city in 1957, population 19 339 (2011c), 18 755 (2006c). The City of White Rock is 48 km by road southeast of Vancouver and is bounded on the north, east and west by Surrey. It began as a recreational resort on the shores of Semiahmoo Bay in SURREY.

Article

Williams Lake

Williams Lake, BC, incorporated as a city in 1929, population 10 832 (2011c), 10 744 (2006c). The City of Williams Lake is located in the Cariboo country of central British Columbia, 545 km northeast of Vancouver.

Article

Lillooet

Lillooet, BC, incorporated as a district municipality in 1996, population 2322 (2011c), 2324 (2006c). The District of Lillooet is located in the southern interior of British Columbia, 252 km northeast of Vancouver.

Article

Montrose

Montrose, BC, incorporated as a village in 1956, population 1030 (2011c), 1012 (2006c). The Village of Montrose is located in the West Kootenay district of southeastern British Columbia.

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Port Hardy

Port Hardy, BC, incorporated as a district municipality in 1966, population 4008 (2011c), 3822 (2006c). The District of Port Hardy is located on the northeast coast of VANCOUVER ISLAND, 391 km by road north of NANAIMO.

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Rebellion in Upper Canada

The 1837 rebellion in Upper Canada was a less violent, more limited affair than the uprising earlier that year in Lower Canada. However, its leaders, including William Lyon Mackenzie, were equally serious in their demands. They wanted democratic reform and an end to the rule of a privileged oligarchy. The rebellion itself failed, but its very failure helped pave the way for moderate and careful political change in British North America. This included the union of Upper and Lower Canada into the Province of Canada and the eventual introduction of responsible government.

Editorial

Vancouver Feature: Little Tramp Graces the Orpheum Stage

When a troupe of English Music Hall entertainers swept through Vancouver in 1911, the star was an acrobatic little comedian who would soon become one of the most famous people in the world: Charlie Chaplin. Another player would carve his own niche in entertainment history, too. Arthur Stanley Jefferson became a beloved star after he changed his name to Stan Laurel and teamed up on film with Oliver Hardy.

Article

Mistaken Point

Mistaken Point was designated as Canada’s 18th World Heritage Site by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) in 2016. It is located in southeastern Newfoundland. Mistaken Point is the oldest grouping of large, biologically complex fossilized creatures found anywhere in the world. The fossils date from 580 to 560 million years ago, when large, multicellular organisms began to appear. Mistaken Point was the fifth Canadian fossil site to be recognized by UNESCO, following Dinosaur Provincial Park (1979), Canadian Rocky Mountain Parks (1984), Miguasha National Park (1999) and Joggins Fossil Cliffs (2008).

Editorial

Editorial: The Arrival of Black Loyalists in Nova Scotia

“Freedom and a Farm.” The promise was exciting to the thousands of African Americans, most seeking to escape enslavement, who fought in British regiments during the American Revolutionary War (1775–83). Following the war, they joined tens of thousands of Loyalists — American refugees who had sided with the British. Between 80,000 and 100,000 Loyalists eventually fled the United States. About half came to British North America. The main waves arrived in 1783 and 1784. The territory that now includes the Maritime provinces became home to more than 30,000 Loyalists. Most of coastal Nova Scotia received Loyalist settlers, as did Cape Breton and Prince Edward Island (then called St. John’s Island).

Editorial

Editorial: William Lyon Mackenzie and the Rebellion in Upper Canada

At 8:00 p.m. on Monday, 4 December 1837, William Lyon Mackenzie set out by horse down Yonge Street to scout the route for his attack on Toronto. At the top of Gallows Hill (below St. Clair Ave.) he met Tory alderman John Powell, himself on patrol from the city. Mackenzie and his men took Powell prisoner. “Do you have a gun?” Mackenzie asked Powell. “No,” Powell replied. Mackenzie took his word as a gentleman and sent him back toward the rebel headquarters at Montgomery’s Tavern.