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Victoria Chinatown

Located on the northern edge of downtown Victoria, Victoria’s Chinatown is the oldest Chinatown in Canada. (See also Toronto Chinatown; Vancouver Chinatown; Montreal Chinatown) Chinese merchants from San Francisco founded it during the Fraser River Gold Rush of 1858. Revitalized in the 1980s by the city and its residents, Chinatown is a popular tourist and cultural destination in Victoria. With gentrification and rising rents, Victoria’s Chinatown is now host to a diverse party of businesses and residents. It remains a historically significant space for people of Chinese descent in Canada.

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Lac-Mégantic (town)

Lac-Mégantic, Quebec was incorporated as a town in 1907, population 5,747 (2021 census), 5,654 (2016 census). Located in Estrie in the Regional County Municipality of Le Granit, the town of Lac-Mégantic is situated approximately 95 km east of Sherbrooke on the northeast shore of Lac Mégantic (see Eastern Townships). The town is Le Granit’s centre of industry (lumber and granite), administration and commerce. On 6 July 2013, a devastating train derailment occurred in Lac-Mégantic (see Lac-Mégantic Rail DisasterRailway Disasters).

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Toronto

Toronto, Ontario, incorporated as a city in 1834, population 2,794,356 (2021 census), 2,731,571 (2016 census). Toronto is Ontario’s capital city, Canada’s largest municipality and the fourth largest city in North America (see also Largest Cities in Canada by Population). It is made up of the former cities of Toronto, North York, Scarborough, York and Etobicoke, and the former borough of East York. The city is home to a large immigrant population, and is a national and international hub for finance, communications and cultural life.

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Powell River

Powell River, BC, incorporated as a city in 2005, population 13,943 (2021 census), 13,157 (2016 census). The City of Powell River is located on the east side of the Strait of Georgia, 133 km northwest of Vancouver. It is bounded on the east by the Smith Mountain Range, Powell Lake and Haslam Lake. The city enjoys a mild climate year-round, moderated by the warm current of the strait. It takes its name from the river draining Powell Lake, which was named for Israel Wood Powell, British Columbia’s superintendent of Indian affairs in the 1880s.

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Victoria (BC)

Victoria, BC, incorporated as a city in 1862, population 91,867 (2021 census), 85,792 (2016 census). The capital of British Columbia, the City of Victoria is situated on the southern tip of Vancouver Island, about 100 km south of Vancouver. Occupying a peninsular site, Victoria is bordered by the Juan de Fuca and Haro straits. In addition, the Olympic Mountains lie to the south, the San Juan Islands to the east, and the fjord-like Saanich Inlet and richly forested Malahat Ridge and Sooke Hills to the west. Greater Victoria lies within the Capital Regional District (CRD), a federation comprising the following incorporated areas: the cities of Victoria, Colwood and Langford; the towns of Sidney and View Royal; and the municipalities of Saanich, Oak Bay, Esquimalt, Central Saanich, North Saanich, Sooke, Metchosin and Highlands. The CRD also includes the electoral areas of Juan de Fuca, the Southern Gulf Islands and Saltspring Island.

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Loretteville

Loretteville, QC, is a neighbourhood in Quebec City. Incorporated as a town in 1947, Loretteville amalgamated with Quebec City in 2002. Loretteville is located about 15 km northwest of downtown Quebec City, on the banks of Rivière Saint-Charles. It is often mistaken for the Huron-Wendat or Wendake reserve, an enclave within Loretteville (see also Reserves in Quebec).

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Markham

Markham, Ontario, incorporated as a city in 1971, population 338,503 (2021 census), 328,966 (2016 census). Markham is located immediately northeast of Toronto. It is one of nine municipalities that make up the Regional Municipality of York. The Rouge River cuts through the municipality diagonally, connecting to Rouge National Urban Park. Initially an agricultural community, Markham is now known for its technology businesses and ethnocultural diversity.

Throughout history, the Markham area has been home to different Indigenous groups, namely the Huron Wendat, Haudenosaunee and Anishinaabeg. The land is covered by Treaty 13 and the Williams Treaties.

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Barrie

Barrie, Ontario, incorporated as a city in 1959, population 147,829 (2021 census), 141,434 (2016 census). Barrie is located at the head of Kempenfelt Bay, on the western edge of Lake Simcoe. Located within Simcoe County, Barrie shares borders with the municipalities of Oro-Medonte, Springwater, Essa and Innisfil. Throughout history, the Barrie area has been home to different Indigenous groups, namely the Huron-Wendat, Haudenosaunee and Anishinaabeg peoples. The land is covered by treaties 16 and 18.

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Oakville

Oakville, Ontario, incorporated as a town in 1857, population 213,759 (2021 census), 193,832 (2016 census). Located in Halton Region, Oakville is west of Mississauga, south of Halton Hills and east of Burlington. The Township of Trafalgar, the Village of Bronte and the Town of Oakville merged in 1962, creating present-day Oakville. Throughout history, the Oakville area has been home to different Indigenous groups, namely the Neutral, Huron-Wendat, Haudenosaunee and Anishinaabeg, including the Mississauga. The land is covered by Treaty 14, also known as the Head of the Lake Purchase (see also Upper Canada Land Surrenders).

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Milton

Milton, Ontario, incorporated as a town in 1857, population 132,979 (2021 census), 110,128 (2016 census). One of four municipalities in Halton Region, Milton’s odd shape means it shares a border with six communities. Milton’s modern borders were created in 1974, from Nassagaweya Township, the Town of Milton, and parts of Esquesing, Trafalgar, and Nelson townships.

Throughout history, the Milton area has been home to different Indigenous groups, namely the Neutral, Huron-Wendat, Haudenosaunee and Anishinaabeg, including the Mississauga. The land is within treaties 3 ¾, 14, and 19 (see Upper Canada Land Surrenders).

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Trois-Rivières

Trois-Rivières, Quebec, incorporated as a city in 1857, population 139,163 (2021 census), 134,413 (2016 census). The city is located at the mouth of the Saint-Maurice River, on the north shore of the St. Lawrence, midway between Quebec City and Montreal and is the regional capital of Quebec's Mauricie region. Its name derives from the 3-armed delta formed by the river's islands at its mouth.

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Windsor (Ont)

Windsor, Ontario, incorporated as a city in 1892, population 217,188 (2016 census), 210,891 (2011 census). The city of Windsor is Canada’s southernmost city. It is located on the Detroit River in the extreme southwest corner of the province. Lying directly south of Detroit on the rich agricultural peninsula nestled between Lakes Erie and  St. Clair, Windsor is an international gateway through which millions of foreign visitors enter the country each year.

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History of Métis Settlements in Canada

Métis communities are found across Canada; however, the only legislated Métis land base is in Alberta. Eight Métis settlements are located across the northern and central-eastern part of the province: Paddle Prairie, Peavine, Gift Lake, East Prairie, Buffalo Lake, Kikino, Elizabeth and Fishing Lake. As of 2016, the settlements cover 512,121 hectares of land and are home to approximately 5,000 people. The Métis Settlements are self-governing and provide for the protection of Métis culture and identity.

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Smiths Falls

Smiths Falls, ON, incorporated as a town in 1882, population 9,254 (2021 census), 8,780 (2016 census). The Town of Smiths Falls is located on the Rideau River, 60 km southwest of Ottawa. The town is an important lockport on the waterway.

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Burlington

Burlington, Ontario, population 186,948 (2021 census), 183,314 (2016 census), is located at the head of Lake Ontario. It borders Hamilton, Milton and Oakville. Burlington was first incorporated in 1873 as a village, as a town in 1915, and as a city in 1974. Amalgamation created the modern boundaries in 1958, combining the Town of Burlington, Nelson Township, and part of East Flamborough Township. Throughout history, the Burlington area has been home to different Indigenous groups, namely the Neutral, Haudenosaunee and Anishinaabeg, including the Mississauga. The land is covered by treaties 3, 8, 14 and 19 (see Upper Canada Land Surrenders).

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The Bog

The Bog was Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island’s historically Black neighbourhood. For over 200 years, Black residents have lived on the island in small communities, but from about 1810 to 1900, Black people were concentrated in this small district. The Bog was located in the town’s west end on marshy, undesirable land. It ran from Government Pond and Black Sam’s Bridge in the northwest to Richmond and Rochford streets in the southeast. Black, white and mixed-race people lived there. At its peak, approximately 100 Black Islanders called it home. Today, there is no trace of the neighbourhood as modern government buildings stand where the historic neighbourhood once stood. However, descendants of the Bog still live on the island and many people are pushing for the neighbourhood’s history to be officially commemorated.

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New Brunswick

New Brunswick is one of three provinces collectively known as the "Maritimes." Joined to Nova Scotia by the narrow Chignecto Isthmus and separated from Prince Edward Island by the Northumberland Strait, New Brunswick forms the land bridge linking this region to continental North America. It is bounded in the north by Québec and in the west by the US (Maine). In 1784, the British divided Nova Scotia at the Chignecto Isthmus, naming the west and north portion New Brunswick after the German duchy of Brunswick-Lunenburg. New Brunswick is now the only officially bilingual province in Canada.