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Rupert's Land

Rupert’s Land was a vast territory of northern wilderness. It represented a third of what is now Canada. From 1670 to 1870, it was the exclusive commercial domain of the Hudson’s Bay Company (HBC) and the primary trapping grounds of the fur trade. The territory was named after Prince Rupert, the HBC’s first governor. Three years after Confederation, the Government of Canada acquired Rupert’s Land from the HBC for $1.5-million. It is the largest real estate transaction (by land area) in the country’s history. The purchase of Rupert’s Land transformed Canada geographically. It changed from a modest country in the northeast of the continent into an expansive one that reached across North America. Rupert’s Land was eventually divided among Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and the Northwest Territories.

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Strathmore

Strathmore, Alta, incorporated as a town in 1911, population 12 305 (2011c), 10 280 (2006c). The Town of Strathmore is located 40 km east of CALGARY. Strathmore was named after Charles Bowes-Lyon, 13th earl of Strathmore (1824-1904), a forefather of Queen Elizabeth II.

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Rexton

Rexton, NB, incorporated as a village in 1966, population 818 (2011c), 862 (2006c). The Village of Rexton is located in southeastern New Brunswick, at the mouth of the Richibucto River.

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Roberval

A navigation centre for the lake and an internationally renowned summer resort until the early 20th century, Roberval also had a few sawmills. The Ursulines built their provincial convent here in 1882. A hospital was added in 1918.

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Russell (Man)

Russell, Manitoba, incorporated as a village in 1907 and as a town in 1913, population 1669 (2011c), 1590 (2006c). The Town of Russell is an agricultural service centre 350 km northwest of Winnipeg near the Manitoba-Saskatchewan border.

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St. Lawrence Lowland

St. Lawrence Lowland is a plain along the St. Lawrence River between Québec City in the east and Brockville, Ontario, in the west, including the Ottawa River valley west to Renfrew, Ontario.

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St. Lawrence River

St. Lawrence River, grand river and estuary, which together with the Great Lakes forms a hydrographic system that penetrates 3,058 km into North America.

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Stefansson Island

Stefansson Island, 4463 km2, highest elevation 256 m, in the ARCTIC ARCHIPELAGO, is a low, gently rolling, lake-strewn plain. Being largely barren, with continuous vegetation only in wet lowlands, it supports small herds of muskoxen and Peary caribou.

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St Croix River

St Croix River, 121 km long, rises in the Chiputneticook Lakes and flows SE to Passamaquoddy Bay, forming part of the border between NB and Maine. It was discovered (1604) by the French, and de MONTS built the first settlement in Acadia on Ile Sainte-Croix (now St Croix I) near the river's mouth.

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St Marys River (Ont)

The obvious strategic value of the river was well known to the Indigenous people before Étienne Brûlé travelled the river in 1622. Samuel de Champlain included the falls on his 1632 map.

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St-Eustache

This village was the site of a fierce battle during the REBELLIONS OF 1837 as Chenier and the PATRIOTES barricaded themselves in the church, priest's house and convent. Nearly 100 Patriotes were killed and the British troops put the village to the torch.

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Morris

Morris, Manitoba, incorporated as a town in 1883, population 1797 (2011c), 1643 (2006c). The Town of Morris is located at the confluence of the Red and Morris rivers, 55 km south of Winnipeg.

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Cumberland House

The construction of Cumberland House in 1774 marked a change in HBC policy, which had hitherto expected Indigenous people to bring their furs to the bay posts to trade.

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Saskatchewan River

The Saskatchewan River is 1,939 km long from the Rocky Mountains headwaters to Cedar Lake in central Manitoba. When including its longest tributary, the South Saskatchewan River, the Saskatchewan River is the fourth-longest river in Canada. It’s a major tributary to the Nelson River, ultimately draining into Hudson Bay. Its name is derived from the Cree word kisiskâciwanisîpiy meaning swift-flowing river. The Saskatchewan River was a major transportation route for First Nations for thousands of years and was an instrumental transportation and resource corridor during the fur trade and early European exploration.

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Saskatoon

The 2 Gowen sites show that hunting tribes were here 6000 years ago. Stratified settlement sites at Tipperary Creek (now Wanuskewin) indicate regular winter habitation by Indigenous peoples.

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Sainte-Agathe-des-Monts

In the 19th century, Sainte-Agathe had only a few sawmills, but the construction of the Montreal and Occidental Railway in 1892 (replaced by the CPR in 1900) encouraged tourism and the development of the hotels that have become the region's economic mainstay.

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Saint-Benoît-du-Lac

  The community was founded by Dom Paul Vannier in 1912 when he acquired a farm at Point Gibraltar, a peninsula sloping down towards the lake. He and 3 other monks began farming and providing religious services.

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St Mary's Bay

St Mary's Bay, on the south coast of Newfoundland's Avalon Peninsula between Placentia Bay and Trepassey Bay, runs 65 km northeast to Colinet Harbour from its mouth between St Shotts and Point Lance, 32 km northwest.