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Saltspring Island

Saltspring Island, BC, 182 km2 is the largest of the Gulf Islands, a group lying in the Strait of Georgia off the southeastern corner of Vancouver Island.

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Spaniard's Bay

Spaniard's Bay, NL, incorporated as a town in 1965, population 2622 (2011c), 2540 (2006c). The Town of Spaniard's Bay is located north of Bay Roberts on the west side of Conception Bay.

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Tracadie-Sheila

Tracadie-Sheila, NB, incorporated as a town in 1992, population 4933 (2011c), 4479 (2006c). The Town of Tracadie-Sheila is situated on the Gulf of ST LAWRENCE, 83 km southeast of BATHURST.

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St. Catharines

St. Catharines, ON, incorporated as a city in 1876, population 133,113 (2016 c), 131,400 (2011 c). The City of St. Catharines is the principal city of the Niagara Region. It lies south of Toronto across Lake Ontario (111 km by the Queen Elizabeth Way), 19 km inland from the international boundary with the United States, along the Niagara River. The city is named after Catharine Hamilton, wife of Robert Hamilton, an influential merchant of Queenston and a landowner with mills on Twelve Mile Creek; the growing community, then known as The Twelve or Shipman's Corners, was renamed in her honour after her death in 1796. After 1876, as the urban area of St. Catharines expanded, it was permitted to annex parts of the surrounding Grantham Township, culminating in 1961 in the complete amalgamation of the township as well as the adjacent towns of Merritton and Port Dalhousie. In 1970, the rural township of Louth to the west was split between St. Catharines and the new town of Lincoln.

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Saint-Charles-sur-Richelieu

Like many places in the lower Richelieu region, Saint-Charles experienced a decline in the second half of the 19th century. Towards the end of the century, one of the village's activities was the transportation of oats to New York City for use as feed for tramway horses.

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Rivière de Rupert

Rivière de Rupert is 763 km long to the head of Lac Témiscamie. It drains Lac Mistassini and then follows a twisted course through a series of lakes and across a flat coastal plain to discharge into southeastern James Bay.

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Roads and Highways

Canada's first highways were the rivers and lakes used by Indigenous people, travelling by canoe in summer and following the frozen waterways in winter. The water network was so practical that explorers, settlers and soldiers followed the example of the Indigenous peoples.

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Antigonish

Antigonish, NS, incorporated as a town in 1889, population 4524 (2011c), 4236 (2006c). The Town of Antigonish is situated on a small plain just over a kilometre from Antigonish Harbour. Located midway between Halifax and Sydney.

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Saanich Peninsula

Saanich Peninsula, BC, forms part of the Nanaimo Lowlands, along Vancouver Island's east coast. It extends from Sidney in the north to Victoria in the south, and is 33 km long and averages 4 km in width; 90 per cent of its perimeter is fronted by sea. The dominant geographical features are Mount Newton and Saanich Inlet.

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Lake St. Clair

Lake St. Clair, 1,114 km, elevation 175 m, average depth 3.7 m, is bordered by the province of Ontario to the east and the state of Michigan to the west. Almost circular in shape, it has a length of 42 km and a maximum width of 39 km. It is connected to Lake Huron to the north by the St. Clair River and drains into Lake Erie to the south via the Detroit River. Lake St. Clair is part of the St. Lawrence Seaway, a significant transportation route stretching from Lake Superior through the Great Lakes to the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The cities of Windsor, Ontario, and Detroit, Michigan, are located at the southwest end of the lake, making it a popular site for recreational fishing and boating.

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St Clair River

St Clair River, 64 km long, flows in a southerly direction, connecting Lake HURON in the N with Lake ST CLAIR in the S, and forms the international boundary between Canada and the US. Its northern portion has an average width of 0.8 km and depth of 8-18 m.

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Rivière Romaine

Rivière Romaine, 496 km long with a 14 350 km2 basin, rises (elev 760 m) in the Québec-Labrador lacustrine plateau, 45 km southwest of the CHURCHILL RIVER, and forms part of the Québec-Labrador boundary north of the 52nd parallel.

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St. Lawrence Hall

St. Lawrence Hall opened in 1850 and was Toronto’s first large meeting hall. Named for Canada's patron saint, it was for many years the centre of cultural and political life in Toronto, hosting many balls, receptions, concerts, exhibitions and lectures.

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St Thomas

  St Thomas, Ont, incorporated as a city in 1881, seat of Elgin County, population 37 905 (2011c), 36 110 (2006c). The City of St Thomas is located in southwestern Ontario, 29 km south of London. In 1803 Thomas TALBOT began to place settlers on a large tract of land he owned N of Lake Erie.

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St. Margarets Bay

St. Margarets Bay, 70 km2, is a small inlet of the Atlantic Ocean on the SE coast of Nova Scotia, 40 km W of HALIFAX. It is a favourite summer resort area, noted especially for its relatively warm surface water, sandy beaches and ideal sailing conditions for small craft.

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Lac Shawinigan

Shawinigan, Lac, 3.2 km2, 6.3 km long, 80 m deep, lies on Québec's Laurentian Plateau, 70 km north of Lac Saint-Pierre on the St Lawrence River. This lake of glacial gouging is prolonged to the east by Petit Lac Shawinigan, Lac Bernard and Lac en Croix.

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Lac Saint-Jean

The Kakouchaks, the local population of Innu, began trading with the Europeans at TADOUSSAC in the 16th century. Later, Lac Saint-Jean was made part of the King's Domain (1674), land reserved for trapping and farmed out to interested parties; a first trading post was built at Métabetchouane in 1676.