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Stonewall

Stonewall, Manitoba, incorporated as a town in 1908, population 4536 (2011c), 4376 (2006c). The Town of Stonewall is located 24 km northwest of Winnipeg on a limestone outcrop in the southern Interlake.

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Queen Elizabeth Islands

The Queen Elizabeth Islands, NWT/Nunavut, are a group of islands in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago lying north of a great bathometric trench composed of (east to west) Lancaster Sound, Barrow Strait, Viscount Melville Sound and M'Clure Strait.

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Quispamsis

Quispamsis, NB, incorporated as a town in 1998, population 17 886 (2011c), 15 239 (2006c). The Town of Quispamsis is located 22 km northeast of SAINT JOHN along the Kennebecasis River.

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Prince Albert

Prince Albert, SK, incorporated as a city in 1904, population 35,926 (2016 census), 35,129 (2011 census). The City of Prince Albert is located on the south shore of the North Saskatchewan River near the geographical centre of the province. As Saskatchewan's "Gateway to the North," open prairie lies to the south of the city and lakes and forests to the north. Prince Albert is Saskatchewan's third largest city.

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Prince of Wales Fort

Prince of Wales Fort is an 18th-century fortification built by the Hudson’s Bay Company at the mouth of the Churchill River, in what is now Manitoba. Today, it is a national historic site managed by Parks Canada.

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Contemporary Railways

In the 4 decades following World War II, Canada's 2 major railways became major conglomerates, among the largest companies in Canada. During the 1950s and 1960s a number of major resource railways were completed.

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Ucluelet (BC)

Ucluelet, BC, incorporated as a district municipality in 1997, population 1627 (2011c), 1487 (2006c). The District of Ucluelet is located on the west coast of Vancouver Island, 175 km northwest of Victoria, at the entrance to Barkley Sound.

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Peace River Lowland

The Peace River Lowland is a gently rolling lowland without clearly defined outer boundaries, extending east of the Rocky Mountains on both sides of the Peace River, sloping downward to the north and east.

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Sechelt Peninsula

The Sechelt Peninsula, approximately 350 km2, is part of a popular cottage area and yachting centre in British Columbia known as the "Sunshine Coast." Isolated from nearby Vancouver, BC, by Howe Sound and the Coast Mountains, its coast is linked by ferries with Vancouver via Horseshoe Bay and with Powell River via Saltery Bay.

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St Albert

St Albert, Alta, incorporated as a city in 1977, population 61 466 (2011c), 57 764 (2006c). The City of St Albert is located along the northwestern city boundary of EDMONTON.

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St Peter's

St Peter's, NS, incorporated as a village in, inc 1940. St Peter's is situated between St Peter's Inlet and St Peter's Bay on the south shore of Cape Breton Island.

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Royal Alexandra Theatre

 The Royal Alexandra Theatre, Toronto, completed in 1907 at a cost of $750 000, is one of the few surviving large professional theatres found in numerous Canadian cities at the turn of the century. It was designed by John LYLE in 1906 for a group of prominent businessmen headed by Cawthra Mulock.

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Saint-Denis-sur-Richelieu

During the REBELLIONS OF 1837 it became a centre for the PATRIOTES who fought against and forced the retreat of Colonel Charles Gore's troops. In retaliation, the village was burned (see ST-DENIS, BATTLE OF).

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Shediac

Shediac, NB, incorporated as a town in 1903, population 6053 (2011c), 5497 (2006c). The Town of Shediac is located on Northumberland Strait, 20 km east of MONCTON.

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Gulf of St Lawrence

Gulf of St Lawrence, a large (250 000 km2), roughly triangular inland sea receiving on average 10 100 m3/s of fresh water from the St Lawrence River at its northwest apex, is connected to the Atlantic by the Strait of Belle Isle at the northeast and Cabot Strait at the southeast corners.

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St Mary's Church

The interior explains the unfamiliar shape; the entrance wall spirals inward past a circular baptistery to shield a broad, shadowed sanctuary under the downward billowing concrete vault. Two concrete cylinders descend from the vault to shed natural light on the altar and tabernacle areas.

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Rupert's Land

Rupert’s Land was a vast territory of northern wilderness. It represented a third of what is now Canada. From 1670 to 1870, it was the exclusive commercial domain of the Hudson’s Bay Company (HBC) and the primary trapping grounds of the fur trade. The territory was named after Prince Rupert, the HBC’s first governor. Three years after Confederation, the Government of Canada acquired Rupert’s Land from the HBC for $1.5-million. It is the largest real estate transaction (by land area) in the country’s history. The purchase of Rupert’s Land transformed Canada geographically. It changed from a modest country in the northeast of the continent into an expansive one that reached across North America. Rupert’s Land was eventually divided among Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and the Northwest Territories.