Search for "New France"

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Grand Bank

Grand Bank, NL, incorporated as a town in 1943, population 2415 (2011c), 2580 (2006c). The Town of Grand Bank is located on the west side of the Burin Peninsula.

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Hudson Strait

Hudson Strait is an arm of the sea connecting the Atlantic Ocean with Hudson Bay and Foxe Channel and separating Baffin Island from the Ungava Peninsula of Québec. The eastern gap is between Cape Chidley, at the northern tip of Labrador, and Resolution Island.

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Sussex

Sussex, NB, incorporated as a town in 1904, population 4312 (2011c), 4241 (2006c). The Town of Sussex is located in south-central New Brunswick in a rich agricultural area, 73 km from SAINT JOHN on the Kennebecasis River.

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Saint-Isidore

Saint-Isidore, NB, incorporated as a village in 1991, population 748 (2011c), 796 (2006c). The Village of Saint-Isidore is located about 10 km inland on the northeastern tip of New Brunswick, 15 km east of TRACADIE-SHEILA.

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Habitat 67

Habitat 67 is an experimental urban residential complex designed by Israeli-born architect Moshe Safdie and located in the Cité du Havre neighbourhood south of Montréal’s Old Port sector. Commissioned by the Canadian Corporation for Expo 67, the project derives its name from the theme of the fair, “Man and His World,” and became one of the major pavilions of the exhibition. It is the only remaining structure from Expo 67 to retain its original function. In 2015, the Guardian called Habitat “a functioning icon of 1960s utopianism, and one of that period’s most important buildings.”

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Elsipogtog First Nation

Elsipogtog (pronounced El-see-buk-tuk) First Nation is a Mi’kmaq community about 91 km northwest of Moncton, New Brunswick. Known for many years as Big Cove, in 2003 the First Nation officially changed its name to Elsipogtog, meaning “river of fire.” However, they are still commonly referred to as Big Cove. Community members largely speak Mi’kmaw and English.

As of 2021, Elsipogtog has 3,509 registered members, 2,703 of whom live on the First Nation’s reserve. The reserve, also known as Elsipogtog, is still referred to as Richibucto 15 in some official documents. It encompasses 19.56 km2.

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Music in Sherbrooke

City in southern Quebec, located about as far south of Quebec City as it is east of Montreal. With its suburbs it has a population reaching about 129,000 (1990); it has been called 'Queen of the Eastern Townships' or of 'L'Estrie,' the more recent name for the area.

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Prince Edward Island

Prince Edward Island is Canada's smallest province, making up just 0.1 per cent of Canada’s total land area. It is situated in the Gulf of St Lawrence and separated from Nova Scotia and New Brunswick by the Northumberland Strait.

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Hanover (Man)

Hanover, Manitoba, incorporated as a rural municipality in 1881, population 14 026 (2011c), 11 871 (2006c). The Rural Municipality of Hanover is located southeast of Winnipeg, encompasses the communities of Blumenort, Grunthal, Kleefeld, Mitchell, New Bothwell, Randolph and Sarto.

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Haileybury

Haileybury, Ontario, unincorporated place, population 3,266 (2016 census) 3,462 (2011 census). Haileybury is located on the northwestern shore of Lake Timiskaming, 150 km north of North Bay. Incorporated as a town in 1904, it amalgamated with the town of New Liskeard and Dymond Township (incorporated 1901) to create the city of Temiskaming Shores in 2004.

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Music in Montréal

Montreal, Quebec is a city located on the island of the same name at the junction of the St Lawrence and Ottawa rivers in the province of Québec. The island is one of a cluster that also includes Ile Jésus (which became part of the city of Laval in 1965) and the islands of Bizard and Perrot.

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Music in Kingston

City at the eastern end of Lake Ontario, founded by Frontenac as Fort Cataraqui in 1673 and later renamed Fort Frontenac. It was captured by the British in 1758 and named Kingston in 1783 by Loyalists fleeing from New York.

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Ross-Thomson House

The Ross-Thomson House is located in SHELBURNE, NS. At the end of the American Revolution, thousands of LOYALISTS arrived in Shelburne. Many quickly left, but others, like George and Robert Ross, settled and began businesses in the new town.

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Reserves in Canada

In 2016, 744,855 people identified as First Nations with Indian Status, 44.2 per cent of which lived on reserves. Reserves are governed by the Indian Act, and residence on a reserve is governed by band councils as well as the federal government. Under the Indian Act, reserves that serve as residences are referred to as Indian Bands. Many reserves or bands are now referred to as First Nations. Reserves may serve as spiritual and physical homelands for their people, but they are also tangible representations of colonial governance. As such they are often the focal point of activism relating to land claims, resource management, cultural appropriation, socio-economic conditions, self-governance and cultural self-determination.

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Saint John River

Saint John River, 673 km long, rises in northern Maine and flows northeast into the forests of Madawaska County to Edmundston, where it is joined by the Madawaska River and turns southeast, forming much of the border between Maine and New Brunswick.

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Music in Fredericton

Fredericton, NB. New Brunswick's capital city, located on the Saint John River on the site of a 1732 Acadian, and later Loyalist English, settlement at St Anne's Point. The name Fredericton was adopted in 1785. Incorporation as a city was accomplished in 1848.