Search for "New France"

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Fort Victoria

In 1842, James DOUGLAS of the HUDSON'S BAY CO selected the port of Camosack (the harbour where Victoria now stands) as a new fur-trade post - eventually to replace FORT VANCOUVER as the company's Pacific headquarters and to bolster the British claim to VANCOUVER ISLAND.

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Aylmer (Qué)

Aylmer, Qué, Sector, pop 41 532 (2006c), 36 085 (2001c). Aylmer is located on Lac Deschênes on the Ottawa River and was a city from 1975-2002 before it merged with 4 other cities to form the new city of Gatineau.

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La Malbaie

First named Baye des Morues, or "bay of cod," by Jean Alphonse in the 1500s, it was referred to as malle baye (latin, "bad bay") by Samuel de CHAMPLAIN in 1608 for its difficult anchorage. Some of New France's first rural settlements were located in the area.

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Pacific Rim

The term Pacific Rim has been used to refer to all those countries with coastlines bordering the Pacific Ocean. However, in recent years the term has become synonymous with the Asia Pacific region which encompasses East and Southeast Asia, South Asia, Australia, New Zealand and North America.

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Erickson

Swedish and Norwegian immigrants were among the first settlers in the region. They took up homesteads in the Otter Lake and Rolling River area on a reserve called Scandinavia or New Sweden, established in 1885 as part of a campaign to attract Scandinavian immigrants to Canada.

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Notre-Dame Basilica of Montréal

Notre-Dame Basilica of Montréal is located at the intersection of Notre-Dame Street West and Saint-Sulpice Street in the borough of Ville-Marie in Montréal. This jewel of Québec’s religious heritage was built by the Sulpicians over the years 1824 to 1829, to serve as a parish church. It is one of the oldest examples of Gothic Revival religious architecture in Canada. At the time it was built, it was a daring, innovative edifice on a scale unequalled anywhere else in North America. The architect was James O’Donnell, an Irish immigrant to New York City. Its interior decor, which was overseen by Victor Bourgeau, along with its rich ornamentation, are unique and evoke a true sense of wonder in visitors. The Basilica is also one of the major tourist attractions in the city of Montréal.

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Petawawa

The township was surveyed in 1857, but it attracted few settlers until 1904, when the Canadian government chose it as the site for a new military camp. Camp PETAWAWA eventually grew to encompass large portions of 4 townships, and has become one of Canada's most important military bases.

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Fredericton

Fredericton, NB, incorporated as a city in 1848, population 58,220 (2016 c), 56,224 (2011 c). The city of Fredericton is the provincial capital and is located in central New Brunswick, just below the head of tide on the Saint John River, 135 km inland from the Bay of Fundy.

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Saint-Charles-sur-Richelieu

Like many places in the lower Richelieu region, Saint-Charles experienced a decline in the second half of the 19th century. Towards the end of the century, one of the village's activities was the transportation of oats to New York City for use as feed for tramway horses.

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Deer Island

Deer Island abuts the border with the US at the entrance to Passamaquoddy Bay on the south coast of New Brunswick. Long in dispute with the US, sovereignty over the island passed to NB in 1817. The name is probably descriptive. Fishing is the most important economic activity.

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National War Memorial

The National War Memorial in Ottawa was originally built to commemorate Canada's sacrifice in the First World War (1914–18). It now honours all who have served Canada in wartime.

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Camp X

Camp X — a popular name that reflects the secrecy surrounding its activities — was a training school for covert agents and a radio communications centre that operated close to Whitby, Ontario, during the Second World War. It was the first such purpose-built facility constructed in North America. Known officially as STS (Special Training School) 103, Camp X was one of several dozen around the world that served the needs of the Special Operations Executive (SOE), the British agency created in 1940 to “set Europe ablaze” by promoting sabotage and subversion behind enemy lines. The radio communications centre, with its high-speed transmitter known as Hydra, was closely linked with British Security Co-Ordination (BSC), the New York-based agency directed by the Winnipeg-born businessman William Stephenson. Soviet defector Igor Gouzenko was hidden there after his defection in September 1945.

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Biggar

Two large secondary industries process barley for malt and manufacture environmental storage tanks. A greenhouse comprising 2 ha for plant micropropagation, a salt mine and a poultry farm also provide employment. Its well-known slogan "New York is Big ... but this is Biggar" greets visitors as they enter the town.

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Dark Harbour

Dark Harbour, located on the west side of GRAND MANAN ISLAND, New Brunswick, is the only suitable haven for fishing craft along the island's western shore, which is dominated by high cliffs. It is relatively isolated from the communities on the more hospitable eastern side facing the Bay of Fundy.

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Avalon Peninsula

Avalon Peninsula, 9220 km2, is a spreading peninsula thrust out into the rich fishing grounds of the north Atlantic, forming the southeast corner of insular Newfoundland.

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Toronto Feature: Chorley Park

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