Search for "south asian canadians"

Displaying 241-260 of 739 results
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Elbow

The first settlers appear to have been ranchers. By 1903 settlers were taking up homesteads near Elbow, and by the end of the decade lands in the elbow were extensively occupied. The CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY, which arrived in 1908, has accounted for the continued existence of the village.

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St. Lawrence Lowland

St. Lawrence Lowland is a plain along the St. Lawrence River between Québec City in the east and Brockville, Ontario, in the west, including the Ottawa River valley west to Renfrew, Ontario.

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Kamouraska (Qué)

In 1849 the first superior court outside Québec City was established here. Incorporated as a village in 1858, Kamouraska was an important tourist area in the 19th and early 20th centuries. People came to admire the countryside, breathe the salt air and bathe in the sea.

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Sainte-Catherine

Sainte-Catherine was the original site of the Jesuit Iroquois mission founded in 1676 and later moved to Caughnawaga (now Kahnawake). The name Sainte-Catherine was quite probably chosen in honour of Kateri (Catherine) TEKAKWITHA. Her empty tomb is located across from the Roman Catholic church.

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Candiac

The Candiac Development Corporation (now Developpements urbain Candiac), a group of Canadian and European investors, owned utilized farmland in the parishes of Saint-Constant, Delson, Saint-Philippe and the town of LA PRAIRIE.

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Labrador

 The Torngat Mts of the far north rise in splendid isolation - the highest peaks east of the Rockies. Though in the same latitude as the British Isles, Labrador's forbidding terrain and extreme climate support only sparse settlement.

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Canada West

In 1841, Britain united the colonies of Upper and Lower Canada into the Province of Canada. This was in response to the violent rebellions of 1837–38. The Durham Report (1839) laid out the guidelines to create the new colony with the Act of Union in 1840. The Province of Canada was made up of Canada West (formerly Upper Canada) and Canada East (formerly Lower Canada). The two regions were governed jointly until Confederation in 1867. Canada West then became Ontario and Canada East became Quebec.

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Jasper National Park

Jasper National Park is a protected area located in the Rocky Mountains, about 370 km west of Edmonton, Alberta. Established in 1907, it was the fifth national park created in Canada. It’s also one of seven parks in the Rocky Mountains that make up the Canadian Rocky Mountain Parks UNESCO World Heritage site (the others are Yoho, Banff and Kootenay national parks, and Mount Robson, Mount Assiniboine and Hamber provincial parks). Among the reasons for the UNESCO designation are the parks’ mountain landscapes, complete with waterfalls, canyons and glaciers, including those found in the Columbia Icefield.

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Lake Winnipeg

The lake lies in a lowland basin that was scoured out of the limestone and shale bedrock by continental glaciers during the ice ages. When the glaciers finally melted, about 12 000 years ago, a large lake, Glacial Lake AGASSIZ, filled the entire basin.

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Saint-Romuald

Saint-Romuald was first settled in 1651 as a fishing establishment by a Québec merchant, Eustache Lambert. But it was agriculture which became the mainstay of economic life until the middle of the 19th century when Saint-Romuald became a sawmilling town.

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Greenfield Park

The site of Greenfield Park was part of the Seigneury of Longueuil. The area remained primarily agricultural until the mid-19th century, when railway development began to encourage the growth of the towns and villages around the city of MONTRÉAL.

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Chaleur Bay

Chaleur Bay, which lies between the Gaspé Peninsula, Québec, and northern New Brunswick, is the largest bay in the Gulf of St Lawrence. At its entrance lies Miscou Island.

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Long Range Mountains

The range, generally steep on the coastal side and scarred by deep glaciation and faulting, reaches highland plateaus and flat-topped peaks before sloping away more gently to the east. In places deep fjords and bays cut into its base, and rivers, such as the HUMBER RIVER, flow through its valleys.

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Drainage Basin

A drainage basin is an area of land that contributes the water it receives as precipitation to a river or network of rivers.

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History of Settlement in the Canadian Prairies

The Canadian Prairies were peopled in six great waves of migration, spanning from prehistory to the present. The migration from Asia, about 13,300 years ago, produced an Indigenous population of 20,000 to 50,000 by about 1640. Between 1640 and 1840, several thousand European and Canadian fur traders arrived, followed by several hundred British immigrants. They created dozens of small outposts and a settlement in the Red River Colony, where the Métis became the largest part of the population. The third wave, from the 1840s to the 1890s, consisted mainly but not solely of Canadians of British heritage. The fourth and by far the largest wave was drawn from many nations, mostly European. It occurred from 1897 to 1929, with a pause (1914–22) during and after the First World War. The fifth wave, drawn from other Canadian provinces and from Europe and elsewhere, commenced in the late 1940s. It lasted through the 1960s. The sixth wave, beginning in the 1970s, drew especially upon peoples of the southern hemisphere. It has continued, with fluctuations, to the present. Throughout the last century, the region has also steadily lost residents, as a result of migration to other parts of Canada, to the United States, and elsewhere.