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Lynn Lake

Lynn Lake, Manitoba, incorporated as a town in 1997, population 482 (2011c), 714 (2006c). The Town of Lynn Lake is a community located 1066 km by road northwest of Winnipeg on the Canadian SHIELD.

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Tadoussac

Tadoussac, Quebec, incorporated as a village in 1899, population 799 (2016 census), 813 (2011 census). Tadoussac is located at the confluence of the Saguenay and St. Lawrence rivers, 210 km northeast of Quebec City. In the Innu language, Totouskak means "breasts," a reference to the rounded hills found near the village.

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Mount Logan

Logan, Mount, elev 5959 m, is Canada's highest mountain, named after Sir William E. Logan by Prof I.C. Russell, who first saw it during an attempted ascent of Mt St Elias in 1890.

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Humboldt

Its designation as a railway divisional point fostered growth, as did the establishment of St Peters Colony (50 townships) by the Roman Catholic Order of St Benedict (1903).

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Greater Napanee

Greater Napanee, Ont, incorporated as a town in 1864, population 15 511 (2011c), 15 400 (2006c). The Town of Greater Napanee is located 39 km west of Kingston on the Napanee River and six km from the Bay of Quinte on Lake Ontario.

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Salaberry-de-Valleyfield

Salaberry-de-Valleyfield draws its labour force from the local population and its history is marked by often violent labour disputes (see COMPANY TOWNS). Originally (1874) it was called Salaberry, in honour of Charles d'Irumberry de SALABERRY.

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Beaverlodge

Beaverlodge, AB, incorporated as a village in 1929 and as a town in 1956, population 2365 (2011c), 2264 (2006c).

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Exeter

Exeter, Ont, Town, urban area, population 4785 (2011c), 4657 (2006c). Exeter is located approximately 50 km north of LONDON.

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Brighton

Brighton, Ont, incorporated as a municipality in 2001, population 10 928 (2011c), 10 253 (2006c). The Municipality of Brighton is located 12 km west of Trenton, near Lake Ontario.

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Kent

Kent, BC, incorporated as a district municipality in 1895, population 5664 (2011c), 4738 (2006c). The District of Kent was named after the county of Kent in England. It is located in the upper portion of the FRASER RIVER LOWLAND of southwestern British Columbia about 117 km east of VANCOUVER.

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Cariboo Road

A contingent of Royal Engineers was brought from Britain to survey the route from Yale, at the head of navigation on the Fraser River, along extremely treacherous terrain to the administrative centre of the Cariboo.

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Varennes

Canada's largest concentration of researchers in the field of ENERGY is concentrated in Varennes.

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Blainville

In 1673, in order to develop the young colony of New France, Governor Louis de Buade de Frontenac gave large concessions of land to administrators, priests and high-ranking soldiers who became seigneurs. The seigneurie des Mille-Îles was created north of the river that bears the same name.

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Lachine

The development of the Lachine Canal in the 1820s, the establishment of the Montreal and Lachine Railroad in 1847, and the expansion of the trucking business in the 20th century gave Lachine a major role in the trade network extending to southwestern Canada and the US.

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Vegreville

Vegreville, Alberta, incorporated as a town in 1906, population 5,708 (2016 census), 5,717 (2011 census). The town of Vegreville is located in the parkland region of east-central Alberta, 100 km east of Edmonton. It serves a rich agricultural region specializing in grains and some livestock.

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Geography of British Columbia

British Columbia is divided by two of Canada’s seven physiographic regions. These regions are the Cordillera and the Interior Plains. The vast majority of the province is in the Cordillera region, while the northeast corner is part of the Interior Plains. Within the Cordillera region there are many mountain ranges, including the Rocky Mountains and the Coast Mountains. British Columbia’s wet, coastal climate is also home to some of the tallest coniferous trees in Canada, such as the Douglas fir.

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Human Geography and Canada

Human geography studies the relationships between people and the environments in which they live. Within the field of human geography there are five main areas of study. These areas are economic geography, cultural geography, political geography, urban geography and environmental geography. In Canada, human geographers might study the status of Indigenous languages or differences between rural and urban Canadians, among many other topics.