Search for "New France"

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Art Galleries and Museums

 Art galleries and museums are institutions that collect, preserve, study and present permanent collections of heritage objects to the public. According to the Canadian Museums Association, there are currently over 2300 museums and related institutions in Canada.

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Niagara-on-the-Lake

Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario, incorporated as a town in 1792 and reincorporated in 1970, population 17,511 (2016 census), 15,400 (2011 census). The town of Niagara-on-the-Lake is located where the Niagara River enters Lake Ontario. In 1970, the old town of Niagara-on-the-Lake joined the Township of Niagara. The township included the villages of Virgil, Queenston, St. Davids, Homer and McNab. Together they became a regional town retaining the name Niagara-on-the-Lake.

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Moon

The dark grey lunar surface reflects only 7% of the sunlight it receives (comparable to the reflectivity of black soil). The moon is dominated by thousands of craters, ranging from microscopic pits to gigantic Clavius, diameter 230 km.

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Yarmouth

Yarmouth, NS, incorporated as a town in 1890, population 6761 (2011c), 7162 (2006c). The Town of Yarmouth is located at the entrance to Yarmouth Harbour at the western tip of Nova Scotia and referred to as Eastern Canada's Gateway.

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Lake Timiskaming

Lake Timiskaming (Lac Témiscamingue), 304 km2, 108 km long, elev 180 m, is located on the Ontario and Québec border in the southwestern corner of Québec. Varying from a few hundred metres to 8 km in width, Lake Timiskaming straddles the boundary, half in Ontario and half in Québec.

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Klondike

Klondike (also spelled Klondyke). The name is derived from a Gwich'in word, thron-duick (hammer river), and identifies a town, a river, and a range of hills in the Yukon.

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Music at Sharon

Music at Sharon. Annual summer concert series at the Temple of the Children of Peace at Sharon, near Newmarket, Ontario, presented 1981-90 under the auspices of the York Pioneer and Historical Society.

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Music at McMaster University

McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont. Founded in 1887 as the result of the union of Toronto Baptist College and Woodstock College (a Baptist preparatory school), and named after Senator William McMaster. The first degrees were awarded in 1894.

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Fort William

Named in 1807 after NWC chief superintendent William MCGILLIVRAY, Fort William occupied a pivotal place in the company's vast trading network. In 1816-17 Lord SELKIRK occupied Fort William for 10 months as a consequence of the SEVEN OAKS INCIDENT.

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Shaftesbury Hall

Shaftesbury Hall. The auditorium in Toronto's first YMCA, built at Queen and James streets in 1872 to designs by the architects Smith and Gemmel. The hall was on the ground floor with a direct entrance from the street, a double gallery, and a seating capacity of about 1700.

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Lethbridge

Lethbridge, AB, incorporated as a city in 1906, population 92,729 (2016 census), 83,517 (2011 census). The City of Lethbridge is located 215 km southeast of Calgary. It overlooks the steep valley of the Oldman River.

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Buddies in Bad Times Theatre

Buddies in Bad Times was incorporated in 1979 by Jerry Ciccoritti and Gilbert, who became the company's first artistic director. Its first production was Gilbert's Angels in Underwear, in which Walsh played Jack Kerouac and Ciccoritti played Allen Ginsberg.

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Resistance and Residential Schools

Residential schools were government-sponsored religious schools that many Indigenous children were forced to attend. They were established to assimilate Indigenous children into Euro-Canadian culture. Indigenous parents and children did not simply accept the residential-school system. Indigenous peoples fought against – and engaged with – the state, schools and other key players in the system. For the duration of the residential-school era, parents acted in the best interests of their children and communities. The children responded in ways that would allow them to survive.

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Navy Island

Navy Island is the only Canadian island in the Niagara River. The 127.9 ha island is named after a British shipyard (1793) where the first naval vessels to sail the Upper Great Lakes were constructed.

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Kitchener-Waterloo

The twin cities of Kitchener-Waterloo are located in central southwestern Ontario, 105 km southwest of Toronto. Each retains its own political culture within a common historical framework and with similar, but by no means identical, socio-economic developments. Kitchener (originally named Berlin), the larger of the two, was the county seat (1853), judicial and financial centre of Waterloo County from 1853 to 1973. It continues to have a predominant influence in the Regional Municipality of Waterloo, which was formed in 1973 by combining several communities and cities, including Kitchener, Waterloo and Cambridge.