Search for "New France"

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Father Lacombe Chapel

Father Lacombe Chapel, located in St. Albert, is generally considered to be the oldest surviving building in Alberta. The chapel was built in 1861 by Father Albert Lacombe, an Oblate of Mary Immaculate missionary. In the early 1860s Father Lacombe became concerned with the future of the Métis.

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Pouch Cove

Pouch Cove, NL, incorporated as a town in 1970, population 1866 (2011c), 1756 (2006c). The Town of Pouch Cove is located about 25 km north of ST JOHN'S near Cape St Francis.

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Joliette

It was founded about 1824 by Barthélemy Joliette, seigneur de Lavaltrie, who wanted to become involved in the forestry industry. The lumber mill was one of the first buildings constructed. The town's economy diversified rapidly with the establishment of stone quarries and a foundry.

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Nunavut

Nunavut, or “Our Land” in Inuktitut, encompasses over 2 million km2 and has a population of 35,944 residents (2016 census), approximately 85 per cent of whom are Inuit. Covering roughly the part of the Canadian mainland and Arctic Archipelago that lies to the north and northeast of the treeline, Nunavut is the largest and northernmost territory of Canada and the fifth largest administrative division in the world. Nunavummiut live in 25 communities spread across this vast territory, with the largest number, 7,740 (2016 census), in the capital, Iqaluit. The creation of Nunavut in 1999 (the region was previously part of the Northwest Territories) represented the first major change to the political map of Canada since the incorporation of Newfoundland into Confederation in 1949. Beyond changing the internal political boundaries of Canada, Nunavut’s formation represented a moment of great political significance; through political activism and long-term negotiations, a small, marginalized Indigenous group overcame many obstacles to peacefully establish a government that they controlled within the Canadian state, thereby gaining control of their land, their resources and their future. As such, the creation of Nunavut represents a landmark moment in the evolution of Canada and a significant development in the history of the world’s Indigenous peoples.

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Hamilton

Hamilton, Ontario, incorporated as a city in 1846, population 536,917 (2016 c), 519,949 (2011 c). The City of Hamilton is situated at the west end of Lake Ontario, on Burlington Bay, 68 km southwest of Toronto, and 66 km west of Niagara Falls and the American border. As part of the reorganization of municipal governments in Ontario, the boundaries of the city were enlarged in 2001 to include much of the surrounding suburban and rural area, including the former towns of Ancaster, Dundas, Flamborough and Stoney Creek, and the former township of Glanbrook. The city is Canada's largest steel producer and a major Great Lakes port.

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Sudbury

Greater Sudbury, Ontario, incorporated as a city in 2001, population 164,689 (2016 census), 163,067 (2011 census). The judicial seat for the District of Sudbury, the City of Greater Sudbury is located on the western shore of Ramsey Lake, about 60 km north of Georgian Bay. When incorporated in 2001, it replaced the former Regional Municipality of Sudbury (1973–2000) and City of Sudbury (1930–2000). The city owes much of its development to the mining industry, in particular the mining of nickel. The largest urban area in northeastern Ontario, Greater Sudbury now offers a concentration of business, cultural and educational services and is recognized for the impressive regreening program that it has been carrying out since the 1970s.

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Winnipeg

Winnipeg, Manitoba, incorporated as a city in 1873, population 705,244 (2016 c), 663,617 (2011 c). The city of Winnipeg is the capital and largest city of Manitoba, and is located at the confluence of the Red River and Assiniboine River 100 km north of the Minnesota border. The name is derived from the Cree name for Lake Winnipeg, 65 km north, win-nipi, meaning "murky water." Winnipeg is an important economic and cultural centre for the Prairies. Lying midway between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, it has been called "Bull's Eye of the Dominion," and because of its location between the Canadian Shield and the prairie, "Gateway to the West."

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Digby

Digby, NS, incorporated as a town in 1890, population 2152 (2011c), 2092 (2006c). The Town of Digby is located on the west side of the Annapolis Basin in western Nova Scotia.

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Notre Dame de Lourdes

Notre Dame de Lourdes, Manitoba, incorporated as a village in 1963, population 683 (2011c), 589 (2006c). The Village of Notre Dame de Lourdes is situated on the northeast slope of the Pembina Hills, 130 km southwest of WINNIPEG.

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Saint-Constant

The early settlement of Saint-Constant dates back to the mid-18th century, even though the parish of Saint-Constant-de-la-Prairie-de-la-Magdeleine was only officially created in 1841.

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Kirkland Lake

Kirkland Lake, Ont, incorporated as a town in 1972, population 8133 (2011c), 8248 (2006c). The Town of Kirkland Lake is located 241 km northwest of North Bay.

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Heart's Content

Heart's Content, NL, incorporated as a town in 1967, population 418 (2011c), 418 (2006c). The Town of Heart's Content is a fishing community on a protected, urn-shaped harbour in eastern Trinity Bay.

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Westport

Westport, NS, incorporated as a village in 1946, population 234 (2011c), 249 (2006c). The Village of Westport is located at the southern tip of Digby Neck, on the eastern side of Brier Island.

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Watrous

NORWEGIAN settlers arrived in the area at the beginning of the 20th century. The community that sprang up to service the area was originally called Mandel after their hometown in Norway.

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Red Lake

Red Lake, Ontario, incorporated as a municipality in 1998, population 4,107 (2016 census), 4,366 (2011 census). The municipality of Red Lake is located in northwestern Ontario on the shore of Red Lake, 555 km northwest of Thunder Bay. The municipality is the result of the amalgamation of the former townships of Red Lake (incorporated in 1960) and Golden (established in 1985), and the unorganized territory governed by the Madsen local services board. Red Lake consists of six communities (Madsen, Red Lake, Balmertown, Cochenour, McKenzie Island and Starratt-Olsen) that sprang up around the area's gold mines.

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South Porcupine

South Porcupine, ON, one of five wards in the city of Timmins. Incorporated in 1911, South Porcupine became a part of Timmins in 1973. The town is named for an island in a local river reportedly shaped like a porcupine.

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Fort Ellice

Fort Ellice was a Hudson's Bay Company trading post located on Beaver Creek near the confluence of the Assiniboine and Qu'Appelle rivers, just east of the present-day Manitoba-Saskatchewan border. Established in 1831 by C.T.

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National Parks of Canada

Canada’s national parks are protected areas established under federal legislation to preserve Canada’s natural heritage. They are administered by Parks Canada, a government agency that evolved from the world’s first national parks service, the Dominion Parks Branch, established in 1911. The National Parks System Plan, developed in 1970, divided Canada into 39 natural regions and set the goal of representing each region with at least one national park. Canada now has 48 national parks and national park reserves in 30 of these regions. In total, the parks cover more than 340,000 km2, which is over 3 per cent of Canada’s landmass. They protect important land and marine habitats, geographical features and sites of cultural significance. National parks also benefit local economies and the tourism industry in Canada.